Obstetrician Gynecologist

Obstetrician Gynecologist

OBGYNDoc

Minneapolis, MN

Female, 36

I am a practicing Obstetrician and Gynecologist, providing care for women in all stages of life. Approximately half of my practice consists of pregnancy-related care, including routine prenatal care, high risk obstetrics, and delivering babies at all hours of the day. The other half consists of gynecologic care, which ranges from routine annual check-ups to contraception and menopause. I perform many surgeries, including laparoscopies and hysterectomies.

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Last Answer on July 14, 2017

Best Rated

Why do some doctors work these crazy 24 or 36-hour shifts? Doesn't their judgment get impaired from the exhaustion?

Asked by ay caramba almost 6 years ago

During my training, I often worked for 48 hour shifts without sleep between, only to return 12 hours later for another shift. This was the traditional way of training residents. Nowadays, there a strict rules in place that limit the number of hours one can work at a time. In real practice however, we continue to work 24-36 hour shifts simply because we don't have the person-power to take shorter shifts. In addition, in our field, there is a need to keep continuity of care- we prefer to follow a patient in labor through delivery, and shorter shifts would mean more frequent turnovers in patient care. If I feel I am ever overtired or impaired, I would certainly call on my colleagues for help.

What's the overall miscarriage rate in the US, and can you describe what it's like to have to break that kind of news to an expecting mother?

Asked by stacy55 almost 6 years ago

Of women who know they are pregnant, the miscarriage rate is approximately 20%. However, miscarriages can also occur so early that a woman might not even know she was pregnant. Thus, we believe that the overall miscarriage rate may actually be closer to 25-33%. Sadly, miscarriages are very common, but that certainly does not make it easier to come to terms with. I find the best way to approach this is by being direct and honest. I always try to be empathetic and express my sympathy for their loss. Many women have already emotionally and spiritually formed a relationship with the fetus they are carrying, and will experience grief and mourning with the loss of their potential child. Some women will even experience depression after their loss and may require counseling. Everyone responds differently to the news, but my job is to remain empathetic and available for questions and support.

Has being an OBGYN affected your own beliefs about when "life" begins? Or swayed your opinions one way or the other on the abortion debate?

Asked by andrea_85 almost 6 years ago

Without becoming too political with this question, I'll simply say no. My responsibility to my patients is to provide them with counseling and the resources available to them when faced with a difficult decision about continuing or terminating a pregnancy. I always support my patients in their decisions. For every pregnant patient, I present the options for genetic screening available. Some people choose to be tested because they are looking for peace of mind, others choose to be tested because they would prefer to be prepared in the event that they are having a child with special needs. Others choose to be tested because they would terminate the pregnancy if there was an abnormality. All are valid options, and I want my patients to feel empowered to make their own decisions based on the education I provide and based on their own personal beliefs.

Just wondering who female OBGYN's pick for their women's health needs. I would think going to a colleague that was also a friend can be a little weird. Do many do a lot of the simple procedures (i.e.pap smears) themselves?

Asked by Curious almost 6 years ago

I can't imagine how one could do a pap smear on oneself. That being said, I think it is difficult for all physicians to choose the provider for themselves and their family. But, doctors are patients too, and we look for exactly the same traits that everyone else does- intelligence, a good beside manner, and empathy.

Do/can doctors ever change their specialty mid-career? Or are you pretty much tied to whatever specialty area you started with? (insert proctologist jokes here :))

Asked by faint-of-heart almost 6 years ago

Plenty of physicans realize mid-career that they have chosen the wrong profession. It is a challenging road to change course because by the time you've finished your training, you are well into adulthood. ObGyn training requires 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school and 4 years of residency. In order to retrain in a different field, you would need at least 3 additional years of residency (long hours, inflexible schedule). But I can't imagine what it would be like to practice OBGyn and be unhappy with my decision- the work hours, the call, and the stress would be pretty hard to tolerate if I didn't love what I do!

Have you ever had to break the news to a patient that she was HIV+? If so, is it hard not to get emotional yourself?

Asked by corrina almost 6 years ago

I have never had to break the news to someone that she is HIV positive. I have told someone that she has hepatitis C, which in many ways, is a very similar chronic disease. Fortunately, the treatments for HIV and hepatitis C have advanced to the point where people have the potential to live healthy, normal lives despite having the virus. I have taken care of patients with HIV and hepatitis C in pregnancy. If the viral loads are suppressed enough, and if they take their medications as instructed, these patients can go on to have healthy pregnancies without transmitting the infection to their babies.

Do you think the ratio of OBGYNs who are pro-life vs. pro-choice is significantly different than in the general population and if so, in which direction?

Asked by David J about 5 years ago

I believe the ratio is probably similar to the general population. Whether we consider them to be ethical, religious or personal beliefs, we all come into this profession with our own beliefs, and one's area of medical expertise doesn't tend to change those.