Obstetrician Gynecologist

Obstetrician Gynecologist

OBGYNDoc

Minneapolis, MN

Female, 36

I am a practicing Obstetrician and Gynecologist, providing care for women in all stages of life. Approximately half of my practice consists of pregnancy-related care, including routine prenatal care, high risk obstetrics, and delivering babies at all hours of the day. The other half consists of gynecologic care, which ranges from routine annual check-ups to contraception and menopause. I perform many surgeries, including laparoscopies and hysterectomies.

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Last Answer on July 14, 2017

Best Rated

Do you suggest infant circumcision? If so what would be the best time to do it? Is it best done immediately, after a few months, or is safer to wait and do it as an adult if you’re so inclined. I’m not religious, and it isn’t done in my culture, so this decision is solely to be based on what is scientifically best.

Asked by curious over 4 years ago

When it comes to circumcision, I can only present the facts, and then the parents have to make their informed decision. The benefits of circumcision include decreased transmission of STDs such as HIV and HPV, and therefore decreased penile cancer; there are also decreased rates of urinary tract infections. However, the American Academy of Pediatrics states that there is no medical indication for circumcision. There are many reasons people choose to have their child circumcised- religious, cultural, and social. It is now standard to use local anesthesia during the procedure, but of course, there will be discomfort associated with the procedure.

Do/can doctors ever change their specialty mid-career? Or are you pretty much tied to whatever specialty area you started with? (insert proctologist jokes here :))

Asked by faint-of-heart almost 5 years ago

Plenty of physicans realize mid-career that they have chosen the wrong profession. It is a challenging road to change course because by the time you've finished your training, you are well into adulthood. ObGyn training requires 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school and 4 years of residency. In order to retrain in a different field, you would need at least 3 additional years of residency (long hours, inflexible schedule). But I can't imagine what it would be like to practice OBGyn and be unhappy with my decision- the work hours, the call, and the stress would be pretty hard to tolerate if I didn't love what I do!

What's the overall miscarriage rate in the US, and can you describe what it's like to have to break that kind of news to an expecting mother?

Asked by stacy55 almost 5 years ago

Of women who know they are pregnant, the miscarriage rate is approximately 20%. However, miscarriages can also occur so early that a woman might not even know she was pregnant. Thus, we believe that the overall miscarriage rate may actually be closer to 25-33%. Sadly, miscarriages are very common, but that certainly does not make it easier to come to terms with. I find the best way to approach this is by being direct and honest. I always try to be empathetic and express my sympathy for their loss. Many women have already emotionally and spiritually formed a relationship with the fetus they are carrying, and will experience grief and mourning with the loss of their potential child. Some women will even experience depression after their loss and may require counseling. Everyone responds differently to the news, but my job is to remain empathetic and available for questions and support.

What made you decide to choose this area as your specialty? Are there other areas you think, in retrospect, you might have preferred?

Asked by Gina G almost 5 years ago

The amazing thing about my job is that every day is a different challenge. I take care of women from their adolescent or teen years all the way through menopause and beyond. For most women, I am seeing them once a year for their annual exam, with an occasional visit in between for problem visits. Over the years, I get to know my patients, and really feel that I am a part of their lives. I see them through graduations, relationships, marriages, pregnancies, career changes,etc. When my patients get pregnant, I have the privilege of participating in perhaps the most memorable and emotional 9 months of their lives, culminating in the most life-changing experience possible when I am attending the delivery. Every day when I leave work, I can reassure myself that I have done my best to make the world a better place. While a career in OBGYN is immensely fulfilling, it obviously has its down sides as well. For one, the job requires taking call, which means that there are times when I have to be available at all hours of the night. I have had many 36+ hour stints during which I am constantly on the go. In addition, there is an immense amount of stress that comes with the knowledge that the actions I take can be life-or-death determining actions. I can't imagine doing anything else right now, but there are certainly moments after a long night of call when I wish I had considered a career in dermatology. But then I remind myself... rashes give me the willies!

Do you think the ratio of OBGYNs who are pro-life vs. pro-choice is significantly different than in the general population and if so, in which direction?

Asked by David J about 4 years ago

I believe the ratio is probably similar to the general population. Whether we consider them to be ethical, religious or personal beliefs, we all come into this profession with our own beliefs, and one's area of medical expertise doesn't tend to change those. 

omg that miscarriage rate is insane! Are there trimester-by-trimester stats on that?

Asked by alison almost 5 years ago

The majority of miscarriages occur in the first trimester. By the time you reach 12 weeks, if a normal heartbeat is detected, the risk of miscarriage is only 3%.

I imagine bringing new life into this world is very gratifying and one of the major pluses of being in your profession. But what are things you dislike about being an OBGYN, both with patient and non-patient care?

Asked by Karen over 4 years ago

The joys of bringing new life into this world are countered by the devastation when a delivery does not go smoothly. Regardless of how advanced our fetal monitoring techniques are, we will never be able to prevent all bad outcomes such as stillbirth or birth injury. Not only is this responsibility emotionally strenuous, but there is also the stress that we could be sued over these bad outcomes that are typically not under our control. Unfortunately, we live in a litigious society, and most ObGyns will experience a lawsuit at some point in their career. This can be morally, emotionally, and financially devastating. The work hours of an ObGyn can be physically challenging, and takes away from family and home life. While I feel extremely fulfilled by my job, there are certainly times when I feel the emotional, physical and mental burnout from being an ObGyn.