HR Executive

HR Executive

HRChick

Seattle, WA

Female, 39

I'm the head of HR for a leading digital media company. I'm responsible for making my company an amazing place to work - or at least I'll go down trying! In short, I set the strategic direction for the HR function of the organization. I wear many hats: member of the executive team, confidant and advisor to my peers regarding people matters, as well as an advocate for all people that work hard to make our products great. People are what make organizations tick, and my job is to empower them all.

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Last Answer on January 11, 2015

Best Rated

Do I have to reveal to my HR I'm running for office? I've been elected before and running again for the last time. I just obtained a PT job and don't want to lose it. It won't cause any conflicts at the moment, but could as media attention ramps up.

Asked by Paz over 5 years ago

The answer somewhat depends. First, I would look at the employee handbook - sometimes, there are specific policies that govern activities outside work relating to conflicts of interest or moonlighting (second paid job). I would check the handbook and see if it raises your particular situation. If not, then it is likely up to you. As an employer, I would appreciate the head's up. But if there's nothing in the policies, then it's your call.

I know it's illegal to discriminate based on nationality, BUT hiring a foreigner often involves visa application costs. Can a company claim that it's the COSTS they can't afford, even though it's essentially the same as refusing based on nationality?

Asked by intl over 5 years ago

Actually - it's more than costs that would prevent a company from hiring someone who needs government approval to work in the US. As part of the process of applying for a visa, the company needs to demonstrate that they are not able to hire a US citizen to do the work. The standards do vary based on what type of visa the employee needs; for example, Green Card standards are higher than for an H1-B. Overall, the company basically tells the government that they need to hire a foreign worker because they are unable to find a US citizen who can perform the work.

If you or someone you know has been turned down for work because a visa is required, it likely is that the company didn't feel they could meet the legal standard of demonstrating that there are no US citizens available for the job.

I just started a part time job. Do I need to disclose the fact I'm running for office? I've been elected before and running again. I live in a semi small town and don't want to lose my job. I don't intend to stay in politics after this term.

Asked by Karen over 5 years ago

The answer somewhat depends. First, I would look at the employee handbook - sometimes, there are specific policies that govern activities outside work relating to conflicts of interest or moonlighting (second paid job). I would check the handbook and see if it raises your particular situation. If not, then it is likely up to you. As an employer, I would appreciate the head's up. But if there's nothing in the policies, then it's your call.

Hi there! Is HRs first priority to protect the company, or the executive leaders when employees retaliate? Two members of my newly expanded team have filed complaints, investigations are underway. When should I consider retaining my own atty?

Asked by Chris almost 5 years ago

HR is tasked with upholding the values, rules and policies of a company - regardless of who is in violation of them. So, if an executive has engaged in harassment, HR will hold them accountable Similarly, if an employee knowingly makes false accusations that are of a harassing nature towards a senior employee, in violation of company policy or local law, HR should hold them accountable as well. One VERY IMPORTANT call out - the key in that statement lies in being able to discern intent and true violation of company policy. It's important that all employees feel they are able to raise concerns to HR without threat. If they fear reprisal for raising issues that may not be in violation with company policy, that can have chilling effect which is very destructive. That's why conducting thorough, impartial investigations are a necessary part of dispute resolution. 

In terms of retaining an attorney, I don't have enough information about the situation to answer you well. As a general response, I would let HR conduct the investigation. If they are good at what they do, they will seek to understand what happened, determine if any violation of company policy exists and, if so, take appropriate steps to address it. That can be everything from issuing a written warning up to termination of employment.  If you don't feel the process is fair, by all means either escalate or seek outside assistance. 

An employee overhears a Manager say " where can I find a hitman " and the employee reports it and is told it was a " joke " but the Manager starts harassing the employee who reported it, what is the solution ?

Asked by Donald Webber over 4 years ago

I'd go back to HR! Employees shouldn't be penalized for reporting concerns in the workplace. And the manager should know better - which it doesn't sound like he does. I'd go back to HR (or the manager's boss) and ask for their assistance in ensuring that the employee's right to raise concerns without fear of retaliation are respected.

I recently found that some of my fellow employees in the same position with less time in seat are making 15-20 thousand more dollars a year...I feel cheated because my education and certifications put me ahead of the game but I am grossly underpaid.

Asked by How to Handle Correctly? about 4 years ago

That's a bummer! I'm sorry to hear that, it really stinks to feel so undervalued.

I recommend that you discuss this with your manager. However, you should do some homework first. Determining pay is a little bit science, and a little bit art. Education and certifications are two factors that count when determining someone's 'going price'. Other items that factor in, sometimes more heavily, include prior experience, time in the field, and previous accomplishments. If you look at salary.com or glassdoor.com, you can get a good idea of salary ranges in general for your field. They typically provide some data that can help you to see what the pay range is and often have data that indicates time in role, scope of job, etc.

I'd do some homework, and then meet with your boss. Be fairly straight forward in letting her know that you were prompted to do some research because of what you learned, and upon further investigation, found that the going rate for your skills is higher than your current pay. Based on that information, ask for a pay review. The worst they can say is no, in which case, I'd ask for an explanation. That alone would give you insight into what it would take to get a pay change in your current role, and you can then decide if you are interested in pursuing that path.

Is your current role a Generalist or Specialist role and Who do you have to report to?

Asked by Renee about 4 years ago

I am a HR Business Partner, and I report into the head of HR for the company.