Elementary School Teacher

Elementary School Teacher

MizzB

10 Years Experience

Boston, MA

Female, 31

I'm an elementary school teacher in a low income district. I work with upper elementary students. I teach English and math.

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26 Questions

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Last Answer on March 19, 2019

Best Rated

How does teacher placement work? Did you have a say in what school you went to? Did you WANT to go to a low-income school?

Asked by JYD over 4 years ago

Teacher placement varies by district. You can apply to a city, to a specific school, or both. I applied to the specific school I work in. I love the school, the staff, and the kids! I did my student teaching here and really fell in love with the school. Technically, I could be transferred to any school in the city at any time. In fact, the first 3 years you are teaching any teacher with seniority can take your specific job if they want it.

Do the students, young as they are, seem to have an understanding that they come from less privileged upbringings?

Asked by Jessie over 4 years ago

I think they do probably understand it, but it has never been a problem in my classroom. They are all at a similar socioeconomic status, so it isn't overtly obvious. They are young enough, too, that they look past many things still.

I heard a stereotype that most teachers are liberals. Do you think that is true in general?

Asked by If 5 months ago

I think that teachers have political views as varied as any other career. In my part of the country (Boston) there are far more people with liberal views than there are in other parts of the country, so it would only stand to reason that we would have many teachers that have liberal political views. I don't know for certain though, as we really don't talk about national politics at work. You may hear us grumbling about local politics, school committees, or budgets, but that's typically the extent of it.

How much faith should we put in those news stories that suggest that US kids are performing terribly compared to other countries? Are they just trumped up for news stories, or is the situation really THAT bad?

Asked by Prof Chaos over 4 years ago

I think that kids in the US are probably underperforming compared to other countries, but I don't think the full story is being told. Our kids are over-tested, and our schools are underfunded. No one wants to put more money in school budgets because it means tax increases or cuts elsewhere. Our teachers work considerably more than teachers in other countries for much less money. In several of the top performing countries, teachers are in the classroom providing instruction for half of the day and planning, training, and grading the other half of the day. In the US no prep time is guaranteed nationally. Teacher's contracts dictate the amount of time you receive. It is generally 40 minutes per day three to five times a week. Lunch is also not guaranteed to be "duty free" and you may have to supervise. During the times that teachers are in the classroom, we are being pushed to teach to a high stakes test. This year alone, I spent 16 days giving my students standardized tests. This isn't even including classroom assessments! I think that a shift in thinking needs to occur before our schools and students will be competitive with other nations.

What do you think about teacher unions and do you belong to one? Do you HAVE to? If you don't, do other teachers who are in the union look down on you?

Asked by Amy over 4 years ago

I am a member of my local union, and I am proud to be one. It is optional, but only around 10 teachers in my large city are not members. I am from the Northeast, which is heavily pro-union. I also come from a family that believes deeply in the union. Without the union, I am sure that pay would be even less and demands be even more!

What is it like working with special needs students?

Asked by lakhjfj39 5 months ago

I think an experience with a special needs student can be just as varied as an experience with a typical student. Some kids with different abilities are more difficult to work with than others, just as some typical kids can be more difficult to work with than others. Kids that have special needs are still just kids when it comes down to it.

Why do teachers really give group projects?

Asked by anonymous about 2 years ago

Research shows that students learn best when they interact and collaborate. A good teacher uses a healthy mix of group projects, independent projects/work, and reflection.