TV Meteorologist

TV Meteorologist

Kevin Selle

Wichita Falls, TX

Male, 52

I've been a broadcast meteorologist on television since the early 1990's. Happy to answer any questions about the weather or local TV news. Yes, I often wear sneakers on set just out of view of the camera.

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Last Answer on August 06, 2017

Best Rated

How much does the average TV weatherman make? And are you paid an annual salary, per episode, or some other kind of arrangement?

Asked by Ken over 4 years ago

Hi, Ken. Big range of answers. At a base level salaries are reflective of the size of the city (we call them "markets"). A beginning TV meteorologist is likely to start by doing the weekend shift in a small market where they might also do some news reporting a couple days per week. Salary in this situation might be between $20,000 and $30,000. From there it does up well into six figures for many larger markets. Most are paid an annual salary.

All else being equal, who do you think is more likely to get the weatherman job nowadays: the funny male, or the hot female?

Asked by Arlington Drew over 4 years ago

Hmmm...trick question. I guess my hope is that the one that has the best meteorology chops gets the job. That said, different markets, and more and more these days, different stations, have different requirements. I recently saw an ad for a weather person in which the bulk of the job description asked for someone who was not afraid to give their opinions on the news stories of the day. Thanks, Drew.

crazy hypothetical but indulge me. let's say my local weather guy predicts a sunny day, and it turns out to be a hurricane. thinking it was gonna be nice out, i didn't prepare for a hurricane and my house gets damaged. could I sue the news program?

Asked by howard (edenton, NC) over 4 years ago

Thanks, Howard. Here is my best analysis, and, of course, I'm not a lawyer. Forecasting can be considered as less than an exact science, and in some ways, a bit of an art. Those of us that seriously practice that art, meaning we have a certain amount of study or serious history in the science of meteorology, are given some level of protection. Now, if a given station provided you with a forecast from an unknown or unreliable source, could you attempt to hold that station accountable? You could certainly make that argument and then it would be up to a judge or jury. Obviously no meteorologist or television station would directly cause any damage, you would need prove some sort of negligence in information gathering, which is unlikely given that a "weather presenter" would mostly likely get their information from a source like the National Weather Service, which obviously has credibility. Good question, thanks.

I am job shadowing a meteorologist and I was wondering if there are any questions that I should ask?

Asked by Jackie about 4 years ago

A lot of meteorologists have some story as to why they got into weather, often times some big event sparked their interest.  Many of us are technology geeks so you probably can't go wrong asking about computers and phones and such.  Good luck!

is there a particular state, region, city, province, etc that meteorologists generally agree is the "ideal" climate? (san diego comes to mind...)

Asked by runnin rebel over 4 years ago

I remember a job posting for a San Diego television station many many years ago that said, "Can you say 72 and sunny?" I think most of us prefer locations that have some action. Some like snow, others severe weather, others hurricanes. I guess the ideal job is in a place with the type of weather you are most interested in. Having been to San Diego a number of times I would agree with you, it is pretty nice!

As a weather guy, are there business opptys that you can foresee that civilians cannot? To use a silly example, knowing it's gonna be a high precipitation year and investing in an umbrella company...

Asked by Shadow1 over 4 years ago

Hmmm...what is that umbrella company ticker symbol again? :) Excellent question.  Actually there is a pretty large industry of private weather companies that do forcasting.  Power companies do seasonal outlooks to anticipate demand.  Trucking companies and airlines employ meteorologists for short and long range information.  And, closer to your example, I believe clothing retailers will consider seasonal forecasts to determine inventory types and levels.  Thanks!

i've tried so many weather apps on my phone and they SUCK. inaccurate forecasts, not user friendly, just crappy altogether. what weather app do you think is the best out there?

Asked by joseph over 4 years ago

Whew...tough one.  I think many of the early popular apps are suffering from design and feature bloat.  On iOS I actually think an app called Wx Alert USA is pretty good since it draws all data directly from the National Weather Service.  A generic radar app that I use often is wxRadar, for current conditions around the region, AeroWeather (a bit more technical) and an excellent technical radar app is RadarScope.  I've looked at several of the Android apps and am not thrilled with any of them.  If you are in a severe weather area I highly recommend WeatherRadio.  I'm working on some ways to improve weather information, stay tuned!  Thanks, Joseph!