TV Meteorologist

TV Meteorologist

Kevin Selle

Wichita Falls, TX

Male, 52

I've been a broadcast meteorologist on television since the early 1990's. Happy to answer any questions about the weather or local TV news. Yes, I often wear sneakers on set just out of view of the camera.

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Last Answer on May 04, 2018

Best Rated

How much does the average TV weatherman make? And are you paid an annual salary, per episode, or some other kind of arrangement?

Asked by Ken about 5 years ago

Hi, Ken. Big range of answers. At a base level salaries are reflective of the size of the city (we call them "markets"). A beginning TV meteorologist is likely to start by doing the weekend shift in a small market where they might also do some news reporting a couple days per week. Salary in this situation might be between $20,000 and $30,000. From there it does up well into six figures for many larger markets. Most are paid an annual salary.

I am job shadowing a meteorologist and I was wondering if there are any questions that I should ask?

Asked by Jackie almost 5 years ago

A lot of meteorologists have some story as to why they got into weather, often times some big event sparked their interest.  Many of us are technology geeks so you probably can't go wrong asking about computers and phones and such.  Good luck!

do weather reporters frequently become news reporters and vice versa? or are news reporting and weather reporting two completely different animals?

Asked by billbo jackson about 5 years ago

Generally not, but there are always exceptions. Probably what happens most is that future news people end up doing weather on the weekends in a smaller city to get started and will then do some news reporting for three days during the work week. I've known of a few weather people who moved to the news side or even sports, and others who move the other way but I would say that is the except rather than the rule. I once had an agent tell me I would be a good anchor, I could tell she was waiting to measure my reaction. I politely told her to keep walking. :)

if a weather guy predicts a sunny day and a thunderstorm ensues, what can cause such an inaccurate prediction?

Asked by jameson about 5 years ago

Great question...complicated answer. A weather forecast is made up of many different data points. One of the most important data sets is the twice daily weather balloons that gather data through the height of the atmosphere. One of the weaknesses in the system is that there is an average of only one or two balloon launches in each state, 12 hours apart. The data from those balloons is used in computers that use mathematical equations that predict how the gases and water in the air will behave. Given that the balloon network has so many gaps in it, certain features can be missed. Also, since the data collected at the time of the balloon is not a perfect picture, the forecast 2, 3, 5 or more days out gets more fuzzy. Kind of making a copy of a copy of a copy on a photocopier.

i've tried so many weather apps on my phone and they SUCK. inaccurate forecasts, not user friendly, just crappy altogether. what weather app do you think is the best out there?

Asked by joseph about 5 years ago

Whew...tough one.  I think many of the early popular apps are suffering from design and feature bloat.  On iOS I actually think an app called Wx Alert USA is pretty good since it draws all data directly from the National Weather Service.  A generic radar app that I use often is wxRadar, for current conditions around the region, AeroWeather (a bit more technical) and an excellent technical radar app is RadarScope.  I've looked at several of the Android apps and am not thrilled with any of them.  If you are in a severe weather area I highly recommend WeatherRadio.  I'm working on some ways to improve weather information, stay tuned!  Thanks, Joseph!

besides being a weatherman or an academic, what else can people do with degrees in meteorology?

Asked by haleygirl about 5 years ago

All kinds of things, great question. Research is a big area, professional storm chaser, there are lots of private companies that provide weather services and information to power companies or trucking companies, aviation as well. We have a guy that does vacation fill-in for us who works for an environmental impacts firm. Another fellow I work with does weather consulting for legal cases acting as an expert witness that involve things like hail or lightning damage. Thanks!

TV news folks seem so polished and stiff, both in their appearance and diction. They rarely come off as real "people." Do you agree, and do your foresee any changes to loosen them up a bit?

Asked by DC Harrier about 5 years ago

I do see changes. Historically news anchors tried to project an air of impartiality so as not to suggest they were on a particular side of an issue. Two currents trends are serving to give news people a little more personality. One is that news programs are including more "entertainment", and, there is some evidence that some viewers prefer to know what side of an issue their news providers are on. That said, "most" of us are "regular" people off the air. :)