CrossFit Coach

CrossFit Coach

CrossFit Coach

NYC, NY

Male, 37

I opened CrossFit Hell's Kitchen NYC in September 2010 and since have coached thousands of CrossFitters. I have had athletes make it to the CrossFit Regionals as well as place in many local competitions. Prior to CrossFit, I ran a Kettlebell club at a gym in midtown Manhattan while I worked as a personal trainer. I am a licensed massage therapist who worked on Randy Johnson "The Big Unit" during his pitching days with the NY Yankees.

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Last Answer on April 21, 2017

Best Rated

Hi, in a scaled competition there are athletes on the other team who can not do a full squat. Is it fair to me, who can do a full squat if they are allowed to not squat all the way? we are doing Fran and a an AMRAP WOD with wall ball shots.

Asked by who that about 2 years ago

I guess it comes down to the rules, the judges and the athletes individual mechanics.

If the rules don't stipulate that the hip crease needs to be below the knee, then it cannot be automatically assumed.

Yes, I know that with both thrusters and wall balls it is the standard, but then again, the standards for a clean and jerk at a weightlifting meet is way different than the standards at an affiliate CrossFit.

Then the individual comes into play. Most rules say something to the effect of limited range of motion needing to be explained to the judges prior.

So, there is no clear cut answer to your question.

Was it "fair"? I guess it is all relative.

I'm 26YO female and started CrossFit last Nov. I recently started doing double classes each day (WOD and Bootcamp) and work out 4-5x a wk just bec I enjoy it so much, but I'm worried if this will damage my metabolism or cause weight loss to plateau?

Asked by ggabs over 2 years ago

The idea of CrossFit is constantly varied movement, so your body never truly gets efficient enough to plateau or end up with "chunky aerobics instructor syndrome" .

Yes, it is an actual thing, you can google it.

I'd be more concerned with overtraining and overuse leading to fatigue and/or injury.

I tell even my seasoned athletes to pay attention to their bodies and take 1-2 full rest days a week. Full Rest means, some mobility work, but not the "recovery" 5k run or row.

But, yes, I know how much fun it can be and why people are here -56, even 7 days a week. This CrossFit stuff is very addicting!

What do you think of the shoes they make specifically for Crossfit training? Do they really help or are they just a gimmick?

Asked by Brat over 3 years ago

Some help a lot.

Nike Metcons are great all around CrossFit shoes. Designed to be stable enough to lift well, grippy enough and sturdy enough to rope climb, but light enough to box jump, burpee too.

Bowling shoes, football cleats, track spikes, boxing and wrestling shoes all have a purpose, as well as CrossFit shoes.

Can you do CrossFit without them, of course, but I'd rather use the right shoe for the right job and not go bowling with my track spikes.

I love CrossFit more than just about anything else in my life. It changed everything for me, my soul and body. Since moving back to NYC it is so insanely out of my budget. Why is CrossFit so expensive and out of reach financially?

Asked by Tori almost 3 years ago

Cost of commercial rent. Plain and simple.

I know of CrossFit facilities that are paying $45,000+ a month. That is over half a million in rent alone!

My brother owns a house upstate. Huge house, 4 bedroom, 3 bath,3 car garage larger than my apartment. 2.5 acres of land, pond in the backyard. He paid less for his property than the down payment alone on my 400sq ft apartment in NYC.

Why, the cost of everything is higher.

If things were cheaper, things would be cheaper....

Have you asked any of the CrossFit gyms about a work for program?

I do it here. We have interns and people that help out for a less expensive or even no cost membership.

It helps everyone out that way and builds a stronger community on top of it all too!

My crossfit box isn't doing well, I have about 25 members and in a good location. How can I promote my box without spending money?

Asked by Emma Pickett 5 months ago

Hi Emma,

There are several things to consider as to why you may not be doing as well as you'd like to be.

Location and population.

How much competition is there? Not just from other CrossFit boxes,but bootcamps, orange theory type facilities, boutique gyms etc. They all can attract your potential customers.

Are your class times convenient?

Are your facilities up to standards? Clean and well equipped?

How is the coaching staff? Are they competent? Is the programming what people want, not just what you think they need?

Is your pricing correct? Do you charge enough for what you offer? Are you overcharging and driving yourself out of the market?

How do people contact you? Email? Do you respond in a timely fashion. Call you? Do you answer, or at the very least return calls within 24 hours tops?

How good is your website? Is it clearly written with the information people seek. Address clearly stated with a google maps link. Pricing. Class schedule. Information on how people can contact you and/or get started.

You could do the best marketing and still not do well. It is the bucket with holes in it dilema. You can pour more and more water in the bucket ( do great marketing and have a ton of people coming in), however, if the holes in the bucket are too large or too many, adding more water doesn't help. You need to look at your bucket first and figure out where your holes are and work on plugging them. This way, whatever you do to draw people in won't be wasted on people leaving.

Please feel free to reach out to me and we can open a dialogue to figure out where the holes in your bucket are first, then work on no cost forms of marketing.

anthony@crossfithellskitchen.com

Hi I'm thin girl but I want to get toned and curvy. I just started crossfitness class a month ago. My question is will it help me get a thigh gap? My thighs touch I hate it. But im afriad that crossfitness will not help me on that area.

Asked by rubi401 over 2 years ago

What is a thigh gap? And why do you want one? I'm assuming not having your thighs touch?

I believe that is based more on genetics and your hip width as well as where the hip sockets sit in your pelvis. If you have wide hips with a more lateral displacement of your acetabulum (hip socket) then I believe your thighs will be further apart and not touch. Since you said you are thin, I am not figuring your thighs touch because they are carrying too much excess adipose tissue meaning you don't have fat thighs. I'm not sure if this helps, but CrossFit surely cannot hurt your endeavour!

I have started looking at locations to open up a crossfit box, however, after speaking to an attorney she pretty much told me some things I need to work on before I go any further. First, I need a business plan. I need help finding a one. Any help?

Asked by Steph almost 2 years ago

Hi Steph,

I would look into the Small Business administration and ask for advice. I know they are a great resource. The way I look at a location to see if it is viable is to figure the sq ft of the space and how many people can fit safely for a WOD. Plan on 125 to 150 square feet per person at a time. This is on the conservative side. I would go up to 200 sq ft per person. A 3000 sq ft floor could have 15 to 20 people on it training. This does not include locker room, shower, bathroom or front desk space. Once you have that number, and know how many people can train at a time. Figure the number of classes per day. 20 people per class X 8 classes per day would be 160 people per day. Our formula is the number of people per day, 160 X 1.5. This would be capacity. In this case 240 total members. If you can survive, pay bills and have a profit with this number, then it may and I stress MAY be viable. Of course there are a lot of other costs other than rent. Payroll, workers comp, unemployment insurance, electric, water, insurance, internet, cleaning and maintenance, trash removal etc etc etc....If after ALL those expenses the numbers still work, then, yes it MAY be viable. However, you will not open the doors with 240 members. Based on your location, demographics of the area and population, the growth factor will vary. This is where the SBA can help much moreso.