Enviro & Petroleum Engineer

Enviro & Petroleum Engineer

Oil Comp Engr

36 Years Experience

Houston, TX

Female, 57

I have worked at a major integrated oil company for over 30 years. I have degrees in Civil and Petroleum Engineering. I currently work with safety, health and environmental management systems. I have worked in operations and safety in both the upstream (finding and producing oil and gas) and downstream (refining, chemicals and distributions) areas. I have travelled all over the world. I enjoy my job but have endured both good & bad business cycles as well as good and bad managers.

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Last Answer on August 21, 2017

Best Rated

Hi! I'm 19 years old and I'm a Sophomore at Texas Tech University, majoring in Petroleum Engineering. I am originally Arab (from Jordan, fluent in Arabic), with a U.S citizenship. Will this SIGNIFICANTLY help me in finding a job in the Middle East?

Asked by Kassem over 4 years ago

Absolutely!  You should be in demand in the US as well.  Keep your grades up, try to get a good summer internship and best of luck to you.

I am attending Penn State for P&NG engineering. If in the future P&NG "dries up"(due to political or (econ/eco)-omical forces), or I simply want to leave the field, how easily would it be to find a different type of engineering job with this degree?

Asked by Chanchetty over 4 years ago

It will depend on how much experience you have and what you want to do when /if you leave.  If you have, say, 10 years of experience wand have been promoted into management, then I would think your chances could be pretty decent of landing another management job in a technical field.  If you become very specialized in a technical area that is unique to oil and gas it could be more difficult. However e, there is always the option of pursuing a master's degree in mechanical engineering or getting an MBA.  Let's say you have a lot of experience in natural gas processing, working with compressors, piping design, corrosion engineering, etc., those skills will be very transferable to other fields.  If you specialize in well log analysislethal would be less transferable. If you love what you do and are good at it, you will make it through any downturns.  US educated petroleum engineers will always be in demand if they are willing to relocate.  I lived through the downturn of 1985 /1986 when the price of oil fell to around $9/bbl.  I only had about 5 years experience but had earned a reputation for being a hard worker who got along well with others And loved the job. 

I am currently a 3rd year student in Petroleum Engineering and the support group for PE majors at my University sucks! Im learning you dont have to have a PE to get a job in PE, so should I change my major?

Asked by Farhana over 4 years ago

Before switching majors, I would see if you can fix the situation.  if you switch majors, you might lose a lot of ground.  If your professors are decent and your program is accredited, I would work with some other students and approach your engineering dean and/or career placement with some proposed solutions.  Do you have a student section of SPE?  If not, consider chartering one;  see if you can get local professionals to come give lectures and help with resumes, interviewing and finding internships; ;  SPE might be able to connect you with a retired petroleum engineer who lives in your area that would be willing to help; consider some joint activities with geology majors;  if you are successful, you will have an impressive achievement for your résumé.  Future employers want to see that you take on a tough problem, show some creativity and solve it.  It is about more than just mastering the technical topics And getting good grades in your courses.  It is about showing that you can work with others and improve things.  Best of luck to you.

Thank u Mam..im doing my 12 grade in india(Chennai).im keen in pursing B.tech petroleum engineering wat s ur advice to take this course..is it worth Mam..?

Asked by sai darshan over 4 years ago

It depends quite a lot on where you intend to pursue a job and what your citizenship is.  I can really only speak for the situation in the USA. Having recruited for a major oil company before, I CAN tell you that US companies will rarely hire a foreign national and  sponsor him or her for US citizenship or a visa unless that a person has a PhD In a very specialized field of study.

Are there realistic ways to decrease the US dependency on foreign oil, or are most of those efforts in vain?

Asked by gregg over 4 years ago

If the price of oil is high enough, there are unconventional reserves that are economic to develop. Plus, high oil prices will encourage conservation which will also help decrease dependence on imports. I think it is way too complicated to say all efforts are in vain.

What are the chances of us hitting peak oil

Asked by Eli over 4 years ago

Whole novels have been written about peak oil, so I could not do it justice here.  I would just say that because petroleum delivers an unbeatable amount of btu's per unit volume as compared to other energy sources and because there is a mature and highly functioning infrastructure to refine and deliver it to the market, it can continue to command high prices.  The high prices fuel technological motivation to find more oil.  Horizontal drilling combined with fracturing is a splendid example of how we have now economically unlocked reserves that we knew were there.  Because we can drill multiple wells from one surface location, we are able to produce the oil (and gas) with a smaller impact on the environment than previously.  I think more breakthroughs will come in the future so it is hard to predict when/if we will hit peak oil.

I am currently employed as a structural engineer with a consulting firm in New York w/3.5 years experience (B.S.C.E). Will getting a structural P.E. and a M.S. in PETE make me attractive to the O & G community? What opportunities would be available?

Asked by Bharring about 4 years ago

It depends on what you want to do in the oil and gas industry.  If you want to stay with structural engineering and work on designing platforms and the like, you would want a master's degree in Civil and you would likely be working for an Engineering & Construction (E&C) Firm and less likely to be working for a major integrated oil company.  If you wanted to work at a major integrated oil company and oversee the work being done by an E&C firm, that is also a possibility, but I think there are fewer jobs there and they are likely to hire an experienced person from an E&C firm.   If you want to get into the day to day operations, a BSCE plus an MS PetE will make you very attractive for a wide variety of entry level positions such as Drilling, Facilities Engineering, Reservoir Engineering and Subsurface Engineering.  There is a pretty large demand right now as the average age of our employees is getting pretty high and a shortage is predicted in the next few years.  Best of luck to you.