CBP Officer

CBP Officer

CBPGuy

4 Years Experience

SouthWest, US

Male, 25

I am a U. S. Customs and Border Protection Officer on the southwest border between Mexico and the United States. I know the ins and outs of the job as seen on TV/News and things intentionally hidden from the media! There's more to this job than "Anything to declare?" I dont know all but I'll do my best to answer any questions you have! All answers are my opinion, and my opinion only!

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169 Questions

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Last Answer on June 16, 2017

Best Rated

What are the telltale signs you look for as indicators that someone's lying or hiding something?

Asked by Seth over 2 years ago

Its very simple. Any person can see when someone is lying. Its human nature not to lie, so when you do your body makes involuntary actions. Your eyes wander no matter how hard you try to look at the officer. Your voice gets higher pitched. You answer questions with a question, like "This car?" You start playing with your beard/hair/finger nails/nose. You start to sweat. A person automatically feels a tremendous amount of pressure when they need to lie and all of those actions mentioned simply just happen.



When will you actually bar someone from future entry into the US rather than just denying them entry on that particular day?

Asked by Samir over 2 years ago

We bar people all the time. When they enter illegally is typical when that enforcement action is used. I bar them for 5 years for first offense, 10 years for second, and 20 years for third. The judge bars them for life. All of this varies on case by case basis.

Honest Q not meant to offend: why are so many customs officers huge dicks? I cross regularly from Canada and 95% of the time the officer is insanely rude as though I'm inconveniencing him. WHY? Can't they do their job w/o treating everyone like crap?

Asked by Baggy Pantz over 2 years ago

This is a difficult question to answer. I cant speak for the Officers in the northern border but Ill answer it from my perspective in the South. We deal with a VAST amount of criminals and non compliants on a daily basis. I handcuff at least 3 people per eight hour shift for various of reasons. We deal with harassment from the public. We answer the same questions. We deal with the media. We deal with managers. Every officer on their own processes thousands of travelers per shift, and very rarely receive any gratitude. We have to be constantly vigilant and alert, because at any moment someone can pull a gun on us (which i've witnessed), brandish a knife (which i've witnessed), or throw a punch (which i've felt). 

Not only that, but we also deal with problems at home because we're never home due to forced overtime. Officers are people too, we stress out like you stress out. I am not trying to condone their behavior but you can kinda see why. I do not behave that way in the slightest bit, but I also dont act like a Walmart greeter either. We are taught to be very stern, otherwise we're a target. I know this isn't a direct answer, but there really is no direct answer to your question.

Is it illegal to record my interaction with a customs officer? Like can I have a dash-cam or audio recorder running as I go through the checkpoint?

Asked by David over 2 years ago

It actually is and its listed somewhere under a law. I cant seem to find it at the moment. However, you are NOT allowed to video record a CBP Officer's inspection, and absolutely no recording or use of cell phones in secondary inspection. You can however record the drive up to the border and thats about it.

Are CBP officers who man the border with Mexico trained much differently than those who work up at the Canada/US border?

Asked by dan79 over 2 years ago

Actually, not very differently. ALL CBP Officers are trained the same at the academy from day one. Its not until you get to your destined Port Of Entry (POE) where they train you and prepare you for what you are more likely to see in that area. The POE training department will teach you and show you what crime and strategies used to carry out the crime is trending in the area to make you more aware of what to look for. From my personal experience, on the southern border we were extensively trained to find hidden compartments in vehicles for drugs or people. From what I've heard from colleagues in the north, they find a lot of 18-wheelers loaded with marijuana, named BC Bud.

Thanks for the answer, didn't want it to come off as mean but I've had some not great experiences with CBP. Wow, can you tell the story about when you got punched on duty?

Asked by Baggy Pantz over 2 years ago

There has been multiple occasions, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights when people are drunk coming back to the United States after partying in Mexico. There's not much to the stories. They don't want to comply, they start getting physical and resistant, and it goes to the ground.

I heard this from a news anchor recently, "Never fight a cop on the street, you will always lose that fight. Fight them in court."

Why doesn't the US have "exit" customs booths like other countries, especially those in Europe? Wouldn't that make it easier to keep tabs on when visitors actually LEAVE the country? Currently, how would the US even know if someone overstayed a visa?

Asked by Pats2015 over 2 years ago

This is just my opinion, but I THINK the reason for it is MONEY. It will cost way too much money to install booths and have Officers man those booths 24/7 just to collect I-94's or stamp passports. Not only that, but in my port, we are short about 300 Officers just to man regular operations. As for the airport, they collect the I-94's through the airline usually. If you dont have an I-94, your name is marked as Departure on our computer systems that are tied to the airlines.

We try to trust the judgement of the Department of State in that they did a thorough investigation on you before giving you a visa. We trust the CBP Officers giving you an I-94 that they fully believe you will return to your country as well. I think the US government relies mostly on the "honor" system. We trust that you will return back to your country by the time the I-94 expires. To catch the liars, we try to do that when you come back for another I-94 using skilled interviewing techniques. Its not THAT hard to catch someone, Officers just need the time to interview them to make them "break". We also catch a lot of overstays from local authorities who have arrested someone, usually for drunk driving, and are not sure of their status in the US.

Hope this helps.

Setting aside the political issue, do you think a Wall would WORK in stemming the tide of illegals?

Asked by Carl over 2 years ago

I think the wall helps but does not solve the issue. At least the wall keeps the MAJORITY of people from just walking over into the US. You have to put in a lot more effort to come in due to the wall and because of that most people do not even attempt. I agree with extending the border fence for the fact that it acts as a deterrent. Imagine if the United States did not have a wall on the southern border? Anyone and everyone from all over the WORLD will just walk right in. That includes terrorists.

So, my short answer, I think the wall works but has its limits.

My brother once had an officer demand to see his phone / email inbox (we think looking for evidence that he was entering for work not pleasure; he wasn't.) Is that even legal? Don't you need a warrant? (My brother refused and was denied entry.)

Asked by eric.keely over 2 years ago

U.S. Customs & Border Protection has a lot more authority than local law enforcement. By crossing the international border, the Fourth Amendment makes an exception for warrant-less searches in regards to our Border Search Authority which can be found in the United States Code. Basically, we do not need a warrant for ANY types of searches we conduct on the border as long as a reasonable officer believes they should do so. So no, we do not need a warrant.

This may be a little hard to hear, but we are basically trained that every alien entering the country is guilty until proven innocent. This is not in a sense as a criminal, but in a sense that we must assume that they are all trying to immigrate here unless they can prove to the officer that they will not. Now, i was not there for your situation with your brother, but it seems like the officer believed your brother was intending to immigrate (live) in the US. Aliens can be denied entry solely based on an officer's suspicion alone. That doesn't happen often, but is completely legal and is written in the Immigration and Nationality Act.



120K salary by my 4th year? I'm in. What kind of education or experience do you need to apply, and is it selective?

Asked by johnny over 2 years ago

You need a minimum of a high school diploma or GED. You need to have no or very limited criminal history. You need to pass a written test. You need to pass a fitness test. Video based test. You need to pass a structured oral board interview. You need to pass a polygraph examination. You need to pass the academy. Then the job is yours! It took my about 2 years to get to the academy. The job is always posted on usajobs.gov

Which contributes more to the number of illegals living in the Southern US: (1) people who enter at a valid port-of-entry and just stay, or (2) those who sneak over the border without going through a POE?

Asked by QueenEsther3 over 2 years ago

Sorry but I would rather not answer this question and give any readers ideas on the best ways of entering the United States illegally. However, with that being said, Google is a better source for fairly accurate statistics.

How do racial tensions affect your job? Does your race play a factor in getting or not getting compliance from people?

Asked by Bill W. over 2 years ago

I am white, and I have been called racist towards Mexicans on very FEW occasions. You dont really see the race card played much. However, gender is a different story. Men don't really like taking orders from women, especially in the Mexican culture. I'm not being derogatory towards the culture, its just simple fact. Female officers have a much harder time gaining compliance from male subjects. However, I wouldn't mess with any of the female officers i've met. They are all pretty cut throat. They may come off rude, but now you see why.

Have you been catching less weed at the border now that it's getting decriminalized in some States? That was one of the big arguments for legalizing it: that it would stem the illegal flow in from Mexico. But has that actually happened?

Asked by 98harmoni over 2 years ago

There has been a significant decline in the smuggling of marijuana but we still see it. We used to catch hundreds of pounds on a daily basis but that has gone down to hundreds on a weekly basis. We are starting to see a rise in meth, probably because the decline of demand for marijuana.

How helpful / cooperative are Mexican authorities when it comes to US immigration and border control?

Asked by Brandon over 2 years ago

Believe it or not, they are actually very helpful and we frequently communicate with them. We even have the Mexican consulate right in our port to help us with undocumented minors. When we expeditiously remove (informal deportation) Mexican nationals, we bring them to a section of the border fence where Mexican authorities are waiting to retrieve them. It goes both ways actually, because Mexican authorities regularly deport US Citizens, then we retrieve them.

They try to give us a heads up when protesters are coming up towards the border from Mexico. We give them a heads up when theres a high speed pursuit and a suspect is fleeing into Mexico. The Mexican authorities then take over in Mexico and deport the suspect back to us. Mexican federales also try to help us out to break up smuggling organizations as well.

Why did you (or do people in general) opt for a career in Border Protection rather than in more traditional law enforcement (aka cops)?

Asked by CS1981 over 2 years ago

I've discussed with Co workers this very topic over the years, and these are the top reasons that I gathered from them, which I also completely agree with as well.

In no particular order:1. Job security. The federal government always pays it's employees and always keeps them employed. It's very rare that a government shutdown happens, but after its all over we still get our paycheck. I have a lot of local cop friends who get nervous about pay cuts and fear being given a pink slip, especially those in small towns.

2. Pay. We are one of the highest, if not THE highest paid, law enforcement agency in the country. After 3 to 4 years, base pay is $75k. With overtime and differentials that adds to about $120k. That's just 4 years on the job..

3. Location. So yea the first few years might suck on the land border, but once you gain some seniority there's many beautiful places around the world where u can temporarily or permanently move to. Places like Dubai, Hawaii, the Bahamas, England, Ireland, Aruba.

Do CBP officers have a duty to let a traveler speak to a supervisor if they ask to? I've gotten TERRIBLE officers (some of whom seemed to be pretty clueless about my visa type) but didn't want to risk making them angry by asking for a supervisor.

Asked by Paula over 2 years ago

Just like with local law enforcement, you can ask to speak with a supervisor at any time. As an officer and public servant, we are required to notify the supervisor.

Do CBP officers talk politics or debate immigration reform at work, or is that kind of talk off-limits?

Asked by Frenchie over 2 years ago

Politics and Immigration reform are our top topics for the break room. This talk is "supposed" to be off limits in public anyway.

What's the most creative way you've caught someone trying to sneak in drugs?

Asked by bobby over 2 years ago

I think the most creative way I've personally seen was crystal meth hidden inside kinder eggs.

I had posted a question about what you see on the screen when you run a passport. I got a response in the email saying that my answer had been posted, but now i dont see my questions either. Could you please repost the reply.

Asked by Sorry to bug you about this, but did you accidentally delete my question and the answer? almost 2 years ago

I did delete it, I wasn't sure if am allowed to disclose that kind of information. But I will say, you weren't wrong with what you said.

I know you have to declare more than $10K when crossing the border, but are agents allowed to seize it anyway if they're suspicious? And do travelers have to prove to YOU that it's not dirty money? (Having to prove a negative is kinda crazy.)

Asked by 10K over 2 years ago

We cannot seize money under suspicion alone, unless you blatantly tell us the money your bringing is illegally earned. The only time your money gets seized (after you declared it) is if you have been under investigation for a while and Agents have gathered enough intelligence and evidence to provide to the courts to make an arrest. This is a long processes and the majority of criminals who declare money dont even know we have intel on them.

So no, you dont have to prove the money is not dirty. If your money is getting seized even after you declared it, at that point its too late.

After the academy, how much say do you get in where you get assigned? Can you choose geography? How about land crossing vs. airport?

Asked by Theod0re over 2 years ago

After the academy you have ZERO say. When you apply for the job, you can apply for a geographical location. Some of them include Southwest border, Northwest, North East, South East, Florida, etc. When you get "the call" to get hired, they offer an unspecified amount of Port of Entries in that geographical location to pick from. After you pick it, your stuck with it until you do a port swap with another officer (after your fully trained) or re apply and start from scratch. You cannot ask for land border or airport. You can only pick what they offer.

If you say that job security is really good, just what would constitute a fireable offense? They never downsize based solely on budget?

Asked by Darryl over 2 years ago

There's a lot of things that can get you fired, but its much much MUCH less than a non federal job. Doing anything ILLEGAL (misdemeanor or felony) can get you fired. If you get a DUI and have a good lawyer you MIGHT be able to keep your job. Aiding in the illegal importation of illegal contraband and aliens WILL get you fired.

Your right, they NEVER downsize based on budget. If budget is an issue, they will cut back on overtime or equipment but NEVER removing employees. The only time there will be a downsize is if an entire agency or department gets disbanded. IF that happens, all the employees are first in line for the next available job in any federal government agency if they qualify for the position.

Lived in US, 5 years ago. Overstayed my VISA by a few days, and voluntarily left. I tried to come back, they said I needed a new VISA. Was a Sri-Lankan then, now have a Bermuda Passport. Do you think they I will be stopped frm entering.

Asked by Rahix almost 2 years ago

You need to obtain a visa prior to entry. You are inadmissible to the United States pursuant to 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I) and 212(a)(9)(B). In order for you to overcome this in admissibility, you need to apply for a visa and obtain a waiver. If you dont and attempt to enter the US anyway, they will most likely set you up for an Expedited Removal.

I have travelled on esta along with my mrs I was honest that my wife was pregnant I have money to pay for her medical treatment. I was denied entry and detained for 27 hours and sent back to my country he wrote on my passport 212 7(a) 1

Asked by Riz over 2 years ago

Unfortunately for you, the Officers have the final say on who can come into the United States. I was not there, so I cannot comment on what the Officers' were thinking.

Are most CBP officers lifers, working there til they retire? What are some popular career moves for officers who want a change?

Asked by Porter over 2 years ago

CBP is not a bad career to be a lifer in. Benefits are incredible, pay is even better. There are certainly are a lot of lifers here. The thing people dont know is that there is a lot more to do with this agency than process travelers and ask "Where are you going? What are you bringing?" We have intelligence duties, cargo screening, canine, training with INTERPOL, etc. When an CBP Officer changes careers, usually its to a Special Agent position within the federal government. The easiest transition is usually with Homeland Security Investigations (former ICE). Besides HSI, CBP Officers will transition over to Special Agent in FBI, DEA, ATF, etc.

Since you've said it's hard to get fired, does that result in a lot of officers who you think, on merit alone, probably shouldn't still be employed but are?

Asked by Laura over 2 years ago

On merit alone, I wouldn't fire anyone. Believe it or not, Its extremely difficult to catch drugs without someone else's help, especially as a newer officer. Some officer's go a full year without catching anything. The cartel's are getting very creative now a days.

I think an officer should be fired based on their professionalism. I would much rather get rid of an officer who has attitude issues over an officer who needs more training to find dope.

If you ran the Southern border for a year and had an unlimited budget, what investments or upgrades would you make?

Asked by j.j. over 2 years ago

I think we need more officers and dogs. Officers are constantly getting forced doubles on a regular basis. Doing this, you kill the moral of the Officers which negatively impact both job performance and interactions with the public. When you have more Officers, more drugs will get caught and people would potentially be treated better. Speaking of drugs, the dogs are an INCREDIBLE tool. Our dogs are regarded as the best in the world for finding drugs; other countries' governments come train their dogs with ours.

I had to pay a $500 fine for having less than a gram of marijuana in my car (friends stuff). I got the fine since it was my car. Is this on my record, and will it affect future elligibility for immigration/permanent residence? Is this a "conviction"?

Asked by Canadian almost 2 years ago

It's hard to give you an accurate answer because I did not process your case. But, I will give you my opinion on what I THINK they might have done.

It looks like they cut you a HUGE break. Technically, if it's in your car, it's yours. I'm honestly surprised they didn't cancel your visa/deny entry, which is why I say they gave you a break.

More than likely, you were not arrested and they did not give you an FBI number so it will not show on a criminal record. It seems like they handled everything "in house". So, they issued you a fine and you probably have a record in our system only. You may be searched every time you enter. If you dont eventually pay the fine, your visa could eventually be canceled or you won't be able to obtain another one. I don't think this issue will affect you in any way other than when you cross the border.

When an individual is detained after trying to ewi will they be deported/ thrown back/ or sign a voluntary departure? Do you guys have a set procedure?

Asked by Curious over 2 years ago

There is no SET procedure, it just depends on the Officer working the case and the Supervisors/Chiefs making a decision on if it would be in the interest of justice to just have them voluntarily return. Expeditiously Removing someone "Throw back" takes a lot more paperwork and a lot more man hours to complete, rather than a simple form for a voluntary departure. Either way, they are still getting fingerprinted and photographed.

Can you train dogs to sniff for both drugs and bombs, or when I see a dog are they typically just looking for one or the other?

Asked by Sines over 2 years ago

Im not sure about the bomb dogs. I dont know which officer's have those because I mostly deal with the narcotics dogs. What I do know about the narcotics dogs is that some are trained for just narcotics and some are trained for narcotics and humans.

Is Mexico still a popular place for bodybuilders to go get illegal steroids, and will you basically send any super muscle-bound guy to secondary inspection like 100% of the time because of that?

Asked by Joe over 2 years ago

Yes, it is very true that illegal and legal prescription steroids are easily accessible in Mexico. However, we do not send muscular men to secondary for the possibility of possessing steroids. We are trained and experienced in reading people. We look for people that stand out and behave differently than the rest. When that happens, I ask myself "What are they trying to hide? Do they have a weapon? Are they a terrorist? Do they have drugs? Illegal documents? Have they done something already that they're afraid of revealing? Or are they just an awkward person?" All of these questions I try to answer by doing an inspection.

I have, on multiple occasions, seized steroids from bodybuilders. However, I don't automatically assume they have steroids because they're bodybuilders. Depending on their behavior, I assume all of the above until I can disprove my theories after inspection.

If you have Permanent Resident card, how can lying about a criminal conviction hurt you with traveling across border? Will you know if someone lied before?

Asked by Canadian Stallion over 1 year ago

When we take your fingerprints, all of your arrest records from anywhere in the country can be viewed. As a Legal Permanent Resident, if you committed certain crimes, we can set you up with an NTA to see a judge for formal removal proceedings. In other words, you will lose your Resident status and be deported back to your country of citizenship.

Only if the officer decided to put notes in the system about you lying before, then yes we will know.

Thanks for the response! What is your advice on following up with this. Request records via FOIA? Call them&ask? I just want to know if this will ever show up on top level checks. I need credentialing for my profession soon. Misdemeanour is no good!

Asked by Canadian almost 2 years ago

The port won't give you any answers, legally they are not allowed to. You can submit a FOIA request but you may also get vague answers with that as well. I can almost guarantee, by the information you provided, you were not given any criminal record by us. It's more than likely they just wrote you a fine and sent you on your way. Hope this helps.

Does CBP have a policy re: racial profiling? I know that it's illegal for employment or housing decisions but when it comes to Homeland Security, doesn't doing SOME profiling simply make good sense, statistically?

Asked by Lou over 2 years ago

Racial profiling is illegal for all law enforcement agencies in the United States. The Department of Homeland Security does allow "targeting". What I mean by this, is that certain countries around the world that are known to be hosts for terrorist organizations are scrutinized further when their citizens are attempting to enter the United States. This all starts from when they are trying to obtain a Visa from the State Department to when they approach a CBP Officer to apply for admission.

I meant I have a student visa from Australia & I was in the US with a valid B2 multiple entry good for 10 years. I stayed for 5mo&5wks. It has been 2 mos since I left the US. I want to visit again before my class starts in August here in Thailand.

Asked by Travelbug over 1 year ago

You will probably be asked several questions as to why you were in the United States for such an extended period of time. It's not normal for a person to be on vacation for 6 months in another country. Be prepared to provide proof of economic solvency to justify your entry into the United States again.

how big is the wall DT is going to build, will it work, and will Mexico pay for it?

Asked by mcmjuly over 1 year ago

I don't know.

Had asked question above about the overstay. You cited the 2 sections. I had overstayed by 20 days, so don't know why 212(a)(9) would apply. Another point - Had tried to re-enter the same day via Canada & was sent back. Anything changes, pleae advise

Asked by Rahix over 1 year ago

I apologize, I misread your question. It would only be 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I).

Nothing changes when adding the issue in Canada unless they decided to bar you for 5 years. You would be made aware if you were.

I hold an ESTA (VWP ppt holder) and travelled to NYC for a week. When I returned to my home country I checked my online I94 and this stated that I departed the US the next day of my arrival and the departure airport was left blank. Why was this?

Asked by Gabriel over 1 year ago

Try checking again to see if it was updated. Sometimes there are system errors, thats the only thing I can think of.

I got my h1b visa 6 months ago, due to my fathers health problems i have to stay back at home country to look after him. i am planning to leave this month. i have already informed my employer and reissued a new offer letter. will it be a problem?

Asked by veny over 1 year ago

No problem at all, the new petition (I-757 i believe) with the new start and end dates is all you'll need, with the visa.

a girl asked me if she could get a ride back to the states, she said she was a citizen & showed me her passport and ID. we go through check point and turns out it wasnt her. i got detained for a few hours. would that show on my record or affect me?

Asked by gullable over 1 year ago

From the information you gave me, you do not have a criminal record. The officer's may have believed your story and there was not enough evidence to charge you. However, you will have a record on our database. This means, every time you interact with CBP, the officer will see that you were transporting an imposter.

Outside of crossing the border, this situation wont affect you at all!

I'm a flight attendant in Toronto and go through US customs often.I have a HUGE crush on a CBP officer there.Would it be inappropriate to ask him if he would like to see me outside work? I'm nervous to ask.He knows my name and I see him a lot.Thanks!

Asked by Delilah about 1 year ago

He might have a crush on you too. It is inappropriate for the Officer to ask you out on a date, which could be the reason why he didn't yet. Theres nothing wrong with you asking ;)

I want to come for my clinical certification program. I have no intensions to do any kind of job in USA. I want to get my certification and go back to my country. What should be my answer? This certification enables to do internship in US but not job

Asked by kaka210 over 1 year ago

Your answer should be an honest answer. Tell the officer exactly what your intention is upon entering the United States. Provide proof of what you intend to do. Provide a certified letter from the program describing what you will be doing and who will be paying for it. Make sure it states that it is an internship.

Honesty is always the best policy. Officer's are known to "throw the book" at someone once they catch them in a lie.

Can a person with valid MRIV and a I-551 stamp re-enter the United States? I just been only 5 months outside the states. I was urgently obligated to return to my country before getting my plastic green card, is there any problem with my re entry ?

Asked by Naser over 1 year ago

If you have a valid ADIT Stamp, which would be your temporary I-551 stamp in your passport, that is all you need to enter the United States in regards to documents. The Machine Readable Immigrant Visa (MRIV) no longer matters nor would it be valid once you received your ADIT stamp.

I hold EAD with H4 Visa, In order to work and get paid I need SSN, which I applied at the Fremont, CA SSA branch office but it is still pending for more than 4 weeks, according to SSA office the request is pending with DHS, can I get some help.

Asked by Bhuvaneshwari over 1 year ago

Sorry, that is out of my area of expertise. Only the SSA and CIS can help you with this issue.

Hello,

I am thinking about applying for CBP or Border Patrol. I have lots of questions about what the job is like and some of its benefits. Who can I talk to about this, or where should I look for answers? Thank you.

Asked by Future LEO about 1 year ago

Unfortunately, there is no national recruiter program for CBP. Some ports do have recruiters, however. You can locate a Port of Entry near you and give them a call to see if they have a recruiter program.

Here is the career's website for CBPO and Border Patrol positions: https://www.cbp.gov/careers

Also, this unofficial forum is what I used to gather information: https://forums.delphiforums.com/customsinspect.

Finally, I am more than happy to answer any questions you have that you can't find an answer to.

Good luck on your journey!

I'm from Thailand with a student visa from AU, when I visited the US and stayed for 176 days with a valid I-94. Am I allowed to go back to the US after spending 2 months in Thailand? I still want to see 5 more states. I've only seen 11. Thanks.

Asked by Traveller over 1 year ago

It depends. Are you still a student with a valid US student visa? If yes, you will be able to enter the US without any issues as long as your in good standings with your school.

If you dont have a valid visa, you need to obtain one before you can enter.

Why do a CBP officer ask for email? Do they have access to email and facebook or any social media platforms?
If a doctor or pharmacist is coming to USA for exam to obtain licensure, is it gonna be a crime? I heard that it falls in crime?

Asked by Kaka210 over 1 year ago

CBP Officers may ask for email for a number of reasons. Our agency does a lot of behind the scenes targeting that people are unaware of. I cant really give you more information than that.

There is absolutely nothing wrong with a doctor or a pharmacist coming to the United States to obtain additional licensing or certification. The only crime would be, if you were getting paid to provide services in the US or if you were to receive some sort of government provided financial aid to pay for the classes.

Thank you so much appreciate all help,itwas an honest mistake. I have today only told my office that we need to get waiver and apply for the same. Thanks again. fyi I myself became aware of my overstay after i got Visa when looking for something els

Asked by Abhishek about 1 year ago

I am glad I could help you. It is much better to take care of this issue now before trying to enter the United States.

Good luck!

Hi my request to convert my L1B Visa to L1A visa was denied just 10 days before my I94 Expiry, it took me 11 days to finish and wrap up things. I moved out of US on 12th day, means 2nd day of I94 Expiry. I got new L1 A visa,Any challenges I may face?

Asked by Abhishek about 1 year ago

Yes, that will be a big challenge for you. On your L1 visa, does it mention anything about a waiver? Overstaying your admission to the United States will almost guarantee at least a Withdrawal if not an Expedited Removal. When it comes to an overstay, even just a day, our hands are tied as a CBP officer. If you overstay once, you are automatically presumed to be an Intended Immigrant, and it is very difficult to overcome that presumption.

The best thing you can do is obtain a waiver from the State Department. If thats not possible, bring as many documents as you can to prove what you do and to prove that you will return home.

Again, this will be extremely difficult for you. It is very likely that you will be removed or asked to leave the United States. I know it sounds bad. However, after you are removed from the US, you can go to the State Department and explain your situation. In my experience, from what you described, you will most likely receive a waiver. Once you receive a waiver, the overstay will no longer be an issue for you.

I lost my green card while abroad, I have already applied and paid the fees for a replacement, I plan on coming to US using a boarding foil; my question is, is it possible to have a temporary ADIT stamp stamped on my passport by the CBP officer?

Asked by Kino 12 months ago

You cannot get an ADIT stamp at the port of entry. You must go to a USCIS office to obtain an ADIT stamp for an expired/lost I-551. The officer at the port will verify your boarding foil and then grant you admission.

Also I may have not been very clear but is this waiver is required even if I have obtained new L1 A visa?Where will it mention in Visa aboutWaiver...I din ask for any waiver when i went for interview so not sure if they havegiven it.

Asked by Abhishek about 1 year ago

The waiver will be mentioned on the bottom of your visa. This should have been disclosed to the US embassy in India when you applied for you L1 A Visa. There is a question on the visa application that says something like "Have you ever overstayed your visit in the United States", to which you would answer yes. After answering yes, the US Embassy will interview you and ask you about what happened. More than likely, they will then grant you a waiver. Once you get this waiver, an immigration officer will not remove you from the United States upon entry.

In my honest opinion, I think you should go to the US embassy in India and explain that you overstayed your previous stay in the United States and tell them why. You should do all of this before you come back to the United States, so they can issue you a new L1 A Visa with a waiver. This also means you will have to pay for a new visa.

As an experienced immigration officer, if i saw that you were a previous overstay and nothing was done about it, i would charge you with 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(II) - because you will not overcome the assumption of being an intended immigrant. If the embassy granted you a waiver for your overstay, then I cannot charge you for that overstay.

How much money should I carry that would be sufficiet to live for 4 or 5 months? I am going to live with my friend. I can bring my credit card too but it might be harmful as I will have no cash. Is that right?

Asked by kaka210 over 1 year ago

You can show bank statements to prove the amount of money you have. There is no magic number that would be sufficient, its whatever the officer thinks would be reasonable.

Is applying for and holding Canadian PR card invalidate my greencard? Does CBP know my status in Canada when I cross the US-Canada border? If I have both cards but live in the US and work in Canada, what can I expect when crossing border everyday?

Asked by kong20100902 over 1 year ago

Legally, you can only be a resident of one country. Having Canadian residency does not automatically invalidate your US residency, but it would be a fact against you. A CBP Officer would set you up to see a judge to make the final determination.

You can go weeks, months, maybe even years crossing the border and not have any issues, but one day you may get caught. Once you lose your "LPR" status the first time, it is extremely difficult to get it again.

I recently emailed a Q of the CBP website, & the info in it could be used against me at a port of entry, if they knew of it. Does the CBP website ever pass on query emails or put them into a computer database to pop up when one's passport is checked?

Asked by Questioner1 about 1 year ago

Thats above my pay grade, sir! I honestly don't know if the CBP website handlers enter information into our computer systems.

Thanks for answering my previous Question, in continuation with previous question, how do i prove that i will return to India? I have bought house recently in India and family is not traveling with me does that help?

Asked by Abhishek about 1 year ago

Basically, you need to show that your whole life is in India. The deed to your home, or tax statements help. A letter from your employer stating that you are located in India and you will be working for your employer on your L1 visa in the United States until XXX date.

I was denied entry and sent home based on admitting i have tried drugs, but not use.
my ESTA was cancelled and i was denied a tourist visa based on my "drug use" was too recent (6 months). I have no convictions.
How long do i need to wait?
confused

Asked by Jenna over 1 year ago

Under 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(II) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, even admitting to a crime can make you inadmissible into the United States. Technically, as per law, you will be permanently inadmissible to the United States for drug use. Generally, there is no waiver for drug use. However, you may get lucky and find a State Department employee at the embassy who will grant you a waiver anyways. There is no length of time you have to wait.

To be honest, with what you said, I can see someone granting you a waiver eventually. But as I stated, under law you are permanently inadmissible.

Thank you for answering my last question. My biggest question is what the job is like... do you consider yourself a first responder where you answer calls and handle emergencies, or is your job mainly security and guarding of the port of entry?

Asked by Future LEO about 1 year ago

Every Port of Entry is different, so the work is a little different. All officers are emergency responders. Most officers in the agency don't "answer calls." We dont respond to domestic violence, pull people over for a broken tail light, etc. Within the port, however, we do respond. Assaults, weapons, drugs, etc.

Our job is mainly this: 1. Prevent terrorists from entering the United States. 2. Prevent drugs from entering the United States. 3. Prevent illegal aliens from entering the United States.

Most of the time your processing travelers that are seeking entry. Sometimes you get some action. There are teams that you can join which actually do join other agencies to serve warrants, dress in plain clothes and tail suspects. Its all about what you make of it and what your goal is.

If an irish illegal left via the Canada or Mexican border to go home. What would the consciences if they tried to re-enter from eg. Ireland or england

Asked by Dave over 1 year ago

It is likely that when you re-enter, the system would alert the officer that you were a previous "Over stay". At that time, your visa will be canceled under 222(g), you will then be processed as an Expedited Removal, charged with 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I) and barred from the US for a minimum of 5 years.

My mom came to visit my family, CBP Officer gave her 6 month, but told her can stay only 3 month,
Should my mom leave after 3 month!

Asked by Vince about 1 year ago

Your mother probably has suspect travel history. If she comes to the US for 6 months, leaves for a month, comes back for 6 months then she's living in the US. Once a person maintains a consistent travel pattern, it can be used to cancel their visa.

Picture this, your a US citizen and you go to Colombia for six months. You come back to the US for a month or two, now you go back to Colombia for another six months, and repeat the cycle. Where do you REALLY live?

I'm 19 years old and I'm travelling with my friend who is 16 years old to the U.S - What documentation do I need for them as I am legal guardian of her? Passport, ESTA, Concent form from parents? We want to visit for a vaction

Asked by jack 12 months ago

Yes, passport, ESTA, and a parental consent form that is notarized will work for you.

Please, make sure it is notarized, or stamped by an official, prior to entering the United States.

A legal visitor to the US is visiting me and we plan to drive to Canada and back into the US. Are they any special requirement when re-entering the US by car, other than a valid passport and US visa?

Asked by VK about 1 year ago

Nope, thats all you need!

Are CBP officers allowed to ask female passengers if they are single and for their phone numbers while on duty and processing those females through to the U.S.?

Asked by Norah over 1 year ago

An officer can ask you if your single as part of the inspection and interview.

Unfortunately, I am not sure exactly if it is against policy or not to ask for your number. I just tried searching our database and couldn't find that. I did find a policy that states "We must make the utmost effort to remain professional in dealing with members of the public."

In my opinion, Officers that ask for your phone number are acting completely unprofessional. If they made you feel uncomfortable in that regard, please report them to the Supervisor immediately. Supervisors usually stand in the back and oversee everything, they have gold oak leaves, silver oak leaves, eagles, or stars on their shoulders.

With all the security at the border, how come they are still so many drugs in the country

Asked by Graham over 1 year ago

Its impossible to catch them all.

I read some stories of people being refused entry. My question on the worst occasion if someone is refused entry do they call authorities in my country to send me back or i return back as a normal traveller and they wont know that i was refused entry

Asked by Anas about 1 year ago

Some countries, by law, we are required to notify their consulate that you have been detained by CBP. Most countries, its voluntary on our part and only if you request it. If you are a violent criminal, we may contact your local authorities. However, for most immigration issues, you just return as a normal traveler like your just coming back from vacation.

This is the list of countries which is mandatory to notify:https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/consularnotification/countries-and-jurisdictions-with-mandatory-notifications.html

I have different friends in US. On my visa application, I have the address of my one friend. However, he is going to another state for family reasons. Now, I want to visit my other friends too. But my friend told me that you have to arrive at the given address (according to the visa application). If you do not, CBP might send you back. Should I change my address where I am going to stay? If yes, how can I do this? I have used his address to receive my medical certifications and exam cards. Now, I have my board certification exam. My examination card and acceptance letter has his address. I am not arriving at this address. Is it going to be a problem?
If it is not a problem, should I tell the CBP officer that my friend is not here? I am going to stay with other friends.

Asked by Kaka210 about 1 year ago

You are not restricted to the address you listed on your visa application. When you apply for admission when entering the United States, you will be asked to fill out a blue customs declaration form (6059B). On this form, list the address you will be staying at.

If you have a special work visa, you would need to contact your employer to update the information.

Hello
I am going to rent an apartment for 3 or 4 months so that I can stay and study without any disturbance. I have a clinical exam and language proficiency exam after. If I rent the apartment, is it going to be illegal as it might sound I am immigrating but I am not?

Asked by kaka210 about 1 year ago

It is not illegal to rent an apartment or own property in the United States. What you need to do is provide proof that you are coming here to take those exams. You may also need to show proof that you have ties to your home country, something that will convince us you will go back.

Are you provided your own patrol vehicle? Or do you not do any patrols since you are stationed at a specific geographic location? And how long at your first duty station before transferring elsewhere?

Asked by Future LEO about 1 year ago

You are not provided a take home. Every port has different duties. Our primary assignments are at the Ports of Entry conducting primary and secondary processing. However, there are many details that are outside of that. Traffic stops, drug/money runs, prisoner transport etc.

I believe you must pass probation (one year) before you can swap with another officer for another port.

A few years back, I had a bad accident. Doctors placed metal plates in leg and arm. Is there any need of medical certificate for this? I walk properly and I am living normally. However, is there any need of medical certificate?

Asked by Rozi about 1 year ago

No, no need for a medical certificate. If you are seeking medical treatment in the United States, then you may need to present insurance information or bank statements showing you can pay for the treatments.

I'm confused and read conflicting information online about vwp travellers and their removal from the US in case they are inadmissible. Can they be put into expedited removal proceedings and if so what forms would they be served with?

Asked by G&T about 1 year ago

A Visa Waiver applicant (VWP) cannot be placed under removal proceedings. The process of removing a Visa Waiver alien is called a Visa Waiver Refusal under section 217 of the Immigration and Nationality Act. To put it simply, it basically means we want you to go back to your country and apply for a visa because based on the facts presented, we will not allow you to enter under VWP status.

You should only be presented with a copy of the sworn statement.

How much do you earn as a CBp

Asked by tom 11 months ago

As a GS-12 (pay scale), I earn about $110,000 a year with overtime. The pay scale goes like this:

GS-5 (first year) = $35,000GS-7 (second year) = $43,000GS-9 (Third Year) = $52,000GS-11 (Fourth Year) = $62,000GS-12 (Fifth Year) = $76,000

After you hit GS 12, every year or so you get a raise of about $2,000 to $3,000. All the numbers mentioned above are approximate and include my additional locality pay.

I ewi in September 1998. I was 18 years old. I was fingerprinted. How
Can I find out if I was given an expedited removal? I did FBI foia and cbp and nothing appeared. But I didn't do uscis foia.

Asked by Vicky about 1 year ago

I'm sorry, but I am not too familiar in this area. I only know of requesting a FOIA or a Redress Inquiry. If that didn't give you any information, then I dont know what else to tell you. Keep in mind, these requests can take up to 6 months or so before you receive anything.There is a number you can call in regards to CBP FOIA, maybe they can help you better than I can?

Take a look at the links I provided:

DHS TRIP: https://www.dhs.gov/dhs-tripCBP FOIA: https://www.cbp.gov/site-policy-notices/foia

If a foreigner entered the country as a tourist for a month, but did a little bit of work and paid taxes on it, would that likely come up as a reason for entry refusal on his next visit (i.e. do CBP and IRS communicate to that level)?

Asked by Questioner1 about 1 year ago

Legally, I cant comment on the level of communication between different branches of the government. What I can tell you is that it is in fact illegal to work as a visitor. This would be cause for a Expedited Removal.

Upon entry of a US Citizen or Permanent Resident (green card holder) from a trip abroad, what does the border protection officer check upon, himself, as well as on the computer system?

Asked by Morgan57 11 months ago

I cant exactly tell you what we see on the computer system, but we check for everything. We look at criminal history, travel patterns, we check your vehicle and person for narcotics.

If a VWP pax had previously breached his conditions e.g. working illegally, what would be the procedure of removing him from the port of entry next time he'd ask for admission? Also would he be barred from re entry? which section of INA?

Asked by G&T 12 months ago

If this hasn't already happened to you, then this would be the process:

You would be processed as a Visa Waiver Refusal under Section 217 of the INA. You will be charged as a 212(a)(7)(A)(i)(I). Part of the policy of the VWP is that you are not entitled to a hearing by an immigration judge and you will no longer be eligible to participate in the program. You will, however, be allowed to reenter the country as soon as you obtain a visa from a US Embassy. You could apply for a new visa the same day if you'd like (In your home country).

After all the paper work is processed at the port, you will then be boarded on the next available flight back to your home country.

if i spend four months in the usa.. how soon can i go back to the united states?

Asked by brii 11 months ago

You need to ask yourself the following question, "If an American citizen came to my country for X many months and comes back X weeks later to stay X many months again, is he really just visiting?"

This what every officer thinks about when seeing someone with a history of remaining in the US for extended periods of time. Every officer calculates "Is this alien spending more time inside this country than outside?"

Theres no clear answer to your question, you just need to make sure your not spending more time inside the US than outside.

AOS pending. I did not apply as principal but as dependant child through parents. I would like to withdraw my AOS application and be independant. Can I apply for TN visa at POE as I am Canadian Citizen? Will I face any dual intent issues?
Pls advise

Asked by Amar 11 months ago

If you are adjusting status, you cannot also apply for a non-immigrant visa. It is illegal. You can, however, withdraw your application with USCIS prior to applying for a non-immigrant TN visa. Do not apply for the TN until after you withdrew your application.

I am not sure of the process on the USCIS side of things, but I would contact them to find out. I am sure it is a fairly simple process. You can even visit one of their offices. I think your parents only have to withdraw the I-864, Affidavit of Support, from your file and thats it.

After you communicated with them, then it will be appropriate for you to apply for TN.

A family member who's is a regular cbp officer is constantly going to Arizona to "work". They don't show any proof of being there. Is this something that happens? Lately they have been going monthly. They are based out of Florida.

Asked by David 11 months ago

For U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the southwest border is in dire need of officers. The agency provides support to those officers by having officers at airports work Temporary Duty (TDY) at various Ports of Entry for extended periods of time. Hundreds of officers have signed up to participate, most voluntarily, very few mandated.

So yes, it does actually happen!

I just wanted to know what the CBP jobs are like in the airports and what kind of education you need to go about getting for a career? Thanks.

Asked by Chrissy 11 months ago

The airport can get fairly boring. For the first several years of your career, you will be posted at "Primary" where you either grant admission to alien's (Entry for US Citizens) or refer suspect individuals for further scrutiny.

Once you have a few years on your belt, you can bid for a secondary position. This is where you will be determining with you will allow someone to enter the United States or return them back to their home country.

There are also other specialty teams where you patrol the airport in vehicles, perform hot stops, interview subjects etc. Those positions, however, are few far and between at airports.

As for education, you only need a high school diploma or GED. Of course, a college degree will make you more noticeable and may start you at a higher pay but it's not necessary.

I need to know if my boss ever worked as a customs officer as he says its and i quote "classified" i myself am former military and there is always a record of these things present

Asked by kris 11 months ago

I do not know where you would find that information.

Hi.Sometime back I had applied for Adjustment of Status (I-485) and have withdrawn it.
Can I apply for TN Visa at the border as a Computer Systems Analyst, I am Canadian Citizen. Thank You.

Asked by Gurmail 11 months ago

Yes, you can apply for a TN. You may be asked about why you withdrew your 485, but it will not hinder your application for non-immigrant status.

It is only illegal if you are trying to apply to both.

I had asked earlier if I can withdraw AOS &apply TN visa as Computer Systems Analyst. You answered yes and that the withdrawal will not hinder my application for non-immigrant status. Q: How long USCIS (TX office) to update records for withdrawal. Tk

Asked by Gurmail 10 months ago

I have no experience with that, however I can imagine that it will be quite some time. Your best bet would be to contact that USCIS office to gather more information.

I am a US citizen. While returning from Canada on the land border, I am asked many times where do I work. If I am a US citizen, why would CBP officer ask me about my work?

Asked by Nasaht 10 months ago

There are many reasons why we ask where you work. Ill explain the best I can.

For one, the officer is trying to have a conversation with you to get a base line feeling of your natural behavior. When you are asked a simple question, you should be able to answer it easily. We pick up on how you answer that question (body mannerisms, eye movement, stutter). Now, when we ask a more difficult question in which you want to lie about (Something that could incriminate you), your body will act differently than when you answered the more simple questions. That's when we know you just lied to us.

All the questions we ask you is to help with our inspection. Say, you work at a location thats open only Monday through Friday. Today is Saturday and your crossing the border saying your going to work. This would lead me to ask you more questions because you dont have work today but your telling me you do.

Ultimately, every new person we interact with is like a blank canvas. We are trying to paint a picture of who you are (if your innocent or a potential criminal) and the only way we can do it is by asking questions.

Hi, Im a current candidate for CBP Officer at the northern border. I honestly prefer a job at the airport, but I was wondering, its your life at risk being more vulnerable at the border with more exposure to weapons? How is the job as a CBP?

Asked by XSS 10 months ago

As long as you carry a badge and a gun, your life is at risk every day. Before applying to any law enforcement job, everyone should ask themselves, "Am I willing to take someone's life in order to defend another's or my own?"



Hey CBP guy, first i'd like to thank you for you service. I am currently going through the application process and was wondering what your typical day looks like? Thanks

Asked by Cjb 8 months ago

Every port has different duties. Our primary assignments are at the Ports of Entry conducting primary and secondary processing. However, there are many details that are outside of that. Traffic stops, drug/money runs, prisoner transport etc.The airport can get fairly boring. For the first several years of your career, you will be posted at "Primary" where you either grant admission to alien's (Entry for US Citizens) or refer suspect individuals for further scrutiny. 

Once you have a few years on your belt, you can bid for a secondary position. This is where you will be determining with you will allow someone to enter the United States or return them back to their home country. 

There are also other specialty teams where you patrol the airport in vehicles, perform hot stops, interview subjects etc. Those positions, however, are few far and between at airports.

When you apply for cbp they let you choose the border you go to?(I would like to stay south)Also, as a cbp can you go out the country for vacations? Lets say mexico?

Asked by Victor06 9 months ago

When you apply for CBP, you are allowed to select the border you want to work at. When they are ready to hire you, they will call you and give you a list of locations to choose from.

Also, there are no restrictions on traveling outside the United States as an officer.

What information does a CBP officer see when they slide a passport through the machine reader?

Asked by Alex 10 months ago

I cant tell you exactly but everything thats written on the passport gets populated on the screen. Also, if you've been arrested, we'll know. If you've ever had any immigration issues, we'll know. A larger version of your picture populates the screen so we can compare your face to the picture easier.

1) What does "n/r" mean in the CBP record?
2) If asked why coming to the US, I answered 'to visit friends', but later when asked more about who are these friends I disclosed that I have a fiance, will it be 'misrepresentation'?

Asked by M07 9 months ago

1) To be honest, I've never seen that before. It may be a local port thing.

2) That doesn't necessarily mean misrepresentation, unless the officer ascertains that you purposely were trying to hide your true intentions. It's not illegal to have a fiance in the United States, but it is illegal to lie to a federal officer regarding the real reason why you want to enter the United States.

Misrepresentation charges are used primarily for people who try to use a stolen visa or stolen passport to make entry.

What happens if someone gives a false testimony and provides ficticious evidence to a CBP officer during secondary inspection but the testimony can't be proven false in order to gain entry? What would the consequences be if that person was caught?

Asked by M.Jones 7 months ago

If you are an Alien seeking admission into the United States and you are caught lying to a CBP Officer in order to gain admission, a visa, or any other type of benefit from the United States, you will be charged under the Immigration and Nationality Act, 212(a)(6)(C).

If you are a United States citizen, you could be charged criminally under 18 U.S.C. Section 1001, and sentenced to up to 8 years in prison.

I have been traveling to the US (VWP) for the past 5 years about 3-4 times a year for 3-4 weeks at a time (American GF). Last time I was "advised" to get a B2 Visa. My Esta is still good and I am never staying for that long. What should I do?

Asked by Bergis81 10 months ago

It is always safer to have a physical B1/B2 visa over the Visa Waiver Program. You have slightly more protections (Not much). From what you stated, it doesn't sound like you spend much time in the US over the average person, however every officer is different.

It's really up to you if you want to get a Visa or not. I would just advise to bring proof of solvency every time you enter to make the officer feel more comfortable about allowing you into the country.

I am currently an NYPD officer began the process for CBP for position at Richford, VT is it worth the transfer from NYPD to CBP?

Asked by Annoly Ramos 6 months ago

To be honest with you, the job satisfaction working for NYPD is much greater than working for CBP. Also, you currently have better retirement benefits with NYPD. However, you will be paid much more with CBP and also have the opportunity to travel the world (if you want to).

Its up to you on what is more important.

Are you allowed to have beards while working for the CBP?

Asked by Garret 8 months ago

Yes. There is a policy on how long it is allowed to be, but I'm not exactly sure of the measurements.

Hi,
If I'm active duty and I went to Mexico without permission, will you guys tell my command or how does that work?

Asked by JJK 8 months ago

Usually we don't care. The only time I ever called shore patrol on a couple of active duty Marines was when one of them was intoxicated and wasn't listening to my instructions. Unfortunately, we fought him to the ground and put him in handcuffs. MP's were not happy to see him or his buddy.

Can you go into more detail about the hiring process? For example, do you get paid while at the academy? Is housing paid for or is it an out-of-pocket expense? What are some advantages provided to veterans?

Asked by Mando 9 months ago

You are paid every day that you are at the job. When you are hired, you go to your assigned port for "Pre-Academy". During this Pre-Academy time your doing mostly clerical work. You are filling out paperwork for your health benefits, TSP (401k), etc. You are also doing online training courses that help you prepare for the job. You are also doing tours of the port and watching officers work. Every port has their Pre-Academy set up differently. Housing is not paid for while your at the port for Pre Academy.

At the academy, you work Monday through Friday with varying start times, but all are only 8 hours a day. You are paid during all the training hours. You sleep in a dorm which is provided by the agency and you eat the meals at the cafeteria, which is also paid for by the agency. All books, supplies, and uniforms are provided by the agency. You really only need to bring a pair of running shoes, boots, shoe polish, toiletries, and off training clothes. You are only allowed to wear the academy's uniform in the gym (on or off training hours).

For Veterans, your given Veterans preference points up to 5 points, i believe, for the initial written test.

I have a criminal record for DUI and Causing a Disturbance from nearly 30 years ago... I'm travelling with my two kids on vacation, Is the CBP officer going to ruin my vacation over it?

Asked by Jimmie 8 months ago

If that is your only criminal arrest in the United States, then you should be fine. You will most definitely be sent to Secondary Inspection where they will review your criminal record. The reason for this is to see if you have anything else in your history which would bar you from entering the United States.

Plan accordingly, depending on the time of day and the amount of travelers, you may be in Secondary for an hour or more.

Even though you have an issued firearm are you allowed to carry off duty any personal firearms? Can you take a test to qualify to off duty carry your personal firearm ?

Asked by Andrew 8 months ago

Under the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA), we are allowed to carry any personal firearm that can be concealed. Generally, this means pistols/revolvers. You are not required to carry only your duty weapon.

I'm not sure of any tests you mean for your personal firearm. I have carried my personal firearm off duty since day one without taking any tests.

I have a B1/B2 visa and was once arrested in the US for a DUI charge,but NOT convicted; I got Reckless Driving instead. Now when I go to the US i'm sent to secondary inspection. Is this because of the arrest? What can I do to not get sent there? Thx

Asked by Rodster 8 months ago

Everyone who gets arrested in the United States (visitor or not) is assigned a permanent FBI number tied to their fingerprints. This number is assigned the moment they take your fingerprints at the police station. When you scan your fingerprints on primary, it sends an alert telling us that you have something derogatory with your fingerprints. It is the job of the Officer in secondary to determine what that is and if it is enough to deny you entry.

You will always go back to secondary unless the FBI expunges your record.

Do fingerprints and photo still in your system? He married a us citizen. 15 years ago he entered the usa with a birth certificate of someone else officer let him entered but photo & Fngerprnts were taken. He wants to get a green card.

Asked by Monica 7 months ago

I'm not sure of your question, but photos and fingerprints are in our system permanently. There may be an expiration date but none that I know of.

Also, I am currently on active duty with about a year and a half left on contract. When would you recommend that I start the application process? Thank you.

Asked by Mando 9 months ago

I recommend you submit your application today! It took me a little over 2 years to get hired. This time frame is very common for all law enforcement positions within the federal government. The process is a very slow and arduous one. For example, you will apply today, in 3 months they will call you to take the test, in 6 months they'll have you do the fitness test, in a year they'll have you take your polygraph, in another 6 to 8 months the second fitness test etc.

I have a B1/B2 Visa and travel to the same US city every month for a weeknd, just to relax (one of my companies is based in the US but I dont work there, as its virtual). Last time I was referred to secondary. Does this mean it will happen everytime?

Asked by Tom 8 months ago

Not necessarily. Sometimes, being referred to secondary only means the Officer on primary wants another Officer to take a bit more time to gather information versus immediately granting you entry into the United States.

On primary, the Officer only has two thought processes; "Yes, I will allow this person in the United States." or "I'm not completely sure if I should". If the Officer is not 100% confident with the first decision, he will send you to secondary for someone else to make a better determination.

If you were hiring a person for this job, what would you look for?

What one thing would you do differently in regards to your career?

What is your advice for someone who is interested in this field?

Asked by nrekay 6 months ago

In my opinion, integrity is the number one thing we look for in a person. As a law enforcement agency, we absolutely can not have someone we cannot trust. As an officer, you have an access to extensive intel, drugs, and people's personal information. You are expected to keep all information confidential and remain professional in your duties.

So far, I am actually very happy with how far I've gone in my career. I consider myself a "go-getter" and have done many things that most haven't, simply because I chased it. A piece of advice I would give if you do get hired to this agency is: Don't limit yourself to the basic tasks. Show interest in new things, try new things, try things others wont.

I would say this is a great career with several opportunities ahead especially for someone young. Also, stick through the hiring process. It might seem like you'll never get it, it took me over 2 years, but take it one step at a time!

Hello, I have a few questions that I will ask over the course of a few posts if that's ok with you! I am currently in the hiring process, I have a date for my SI and it seems I will be doing the polygraph test in about 3 weeks. Any tips for a rookie?

Asked by Andrew 8 months ago

The only tip I can offer is to be completely honest during the polygraph. Regardless of how your past was (previous drug use, etc.), we are looking at your honesty. Integrity is one of the top core values every law enforcement agency looks for.

Thanks for the quick reply, I'm freaking out over here...lol Do I even go through US customs on a direct flight from Toronto to Cancun? I've heard yes and I've heard no...

Asked by Jimmie 8 months ago

If your flight does not touch down on US soil at any point in time, you will not see a CBP Officer. Now, if your flight from Toronto connected to, say Miami, then Cancun, you would then see a CBP Officer.

I have a felony on my record (17 years ago) I am a legal resident alien since 1989. I have traveled outside USA 6 times. Can i be denied re entry at any time? My family are all citizens and would face major hardship if I am detained or deported.

Asked by J.JOHAL 8 months ago

Depending on your crime, you could be placed under INA 240 Removal Proceedings and provided a Notice to Appear before an immigration judge to determine if you would lose your Legal Permanent Resident status. A CBP Officer is is not legally able to make that determination, only a judge can.

24 years old with my associates in CJ; looking to potentially get into CBP. Whats the academy like? Likelihood of landing the job? Also, do you know of any beard policy?

Asked by George 7 months ago

You have a high probability of getting the job if your willing to go to the southwest border.

At the academy, you work Monday through Friday with varying start times, but all are 9 hours a day. You are paid during all the training hours. You sleep in a dorm which is provided by the agency and you eat the meals at the cafeteria, which is also paid for by the agency. All books, supplies, and uniforms are provided by the agency. You really only need to bring a pair of running shoes, boots, shoe polish, toiletries, and off training clothes. You are only allowed to wear the academy's uniform in the gym (on or off training hours). You shoot twice a week and you do PT between 2 to 4 times a week. On the weekends your free to do as a you please, you just need to make sure your back in time before class.

Last firearm arm question, because most POE are in rural areas, are you allowed to also travel with a rifle/shotgun, etc ? Even though you have an issued sidearm, is that possible? For extra protection?

Asked by Andrew 8 months ago

For work purposes, you are only allowed to carry, on duty, agency issued weapons. If it is not agency issued, you should not have it. However, some POE's may have different policies in regards to that due to being out in rural areas. I have been to a couple POE's and the rules have been the same (Agency issued only).

I am currently a nurse (and yes, I know it's crazy to leave the medical field) I know starting salary isn't much, but is it true that even in your first year you can make up to $75k with OT ?

Asked by Andrew 8 months ago

On your first year, it is extremely unlikely you will hit $75k. For approximately 6 to 9 months you will be training (depending on if you need the Spanish academy). During training, there is zero overtime. Also, in your first year, depending on your qualifications, you will be hired as a GS-5 (approximately $36k base) or GS-7 (approximately $44k base).

As a GS-12 (pay scale), I earn about $110,000 a year with overtime. The pay scale goes like this:

GS-5 (first year) = $36,000 GS-7 (second year) = $44,000GS-9 (Third Year) = $53,000GS-11 (Fourth Year) = $63,000GS-12 (Fifth Year) = $76,000

After you hit GS 12, every year or so you get a raise of about $2,000 to $3,000. All the numbers mentioned above are approximate and include my additional locality pay. All these numbers are approximates and varies.

Under law, we can earn a maximum of $35k a year on premium pay alone. Most officers earn that $35k almost every year.

After being refered to secondary almost every other time I go back to US, it really annoys me that CBP officers go through my phone. Can I refuse to provide password to it? What are the reprecussions of that?

Asked by tpbacon 8 months ago

If you are an alien applying for admission to the United States, you can be removed from the United States if you cannot overcome the presumption of being inadmissible. This presumption is based on the Officer's discretion.

Under Border Search Authority, and for national security purposes, Officer's are legally allowed to search your phone (any electronic device) or use computer systems that can replicate the information contained within your phone. You are allowed to verbally deny them, but legally they can then formally seize it and return it to you at a later date if they determined it be necessary.

Thanks for being here, CBP Guy. I was wondering if you are able to date dreamers or foriegners in the US. Also i live in a sanctuary city is it against the rules for you to eat at establishments that may not follow immigration laws? Thanks

Asked by Hawaiian 123 6 months ago

There is nothing against policy regarding dating a foreign national. There is, however, a policy that forbids you to associate with illegal aliens. A DREAMer is considered an illegal alien, by law.

There is also nothing against policy regarding "Sanctuary Cities", so I can confidently say that there are no issues with you living there. As long as you are honestly unaware of the immigration status of the people you deal with outside of work, nothing "bad" would happen to you. So, if you unknowingly go to a restaurant with illegal waiters and there happens to be a raid, theoretically, you should be in the clear because you did not know. However, if you were to hire illegal aliens to perform work for you at your home, then that would be a different story.

What are your thoughts or tips on women applying for the CBPO position?

Asked by MLopezP 8 months ago

Do it! We need your help! All law enforcement agencies are in desperate need of female officers, not just CBP.

My biggest tip is to have thick skin. Your brothers in blue will be your biggest support as the people crossing the border size you up every day.

Hi CBPGuy, if a person is granted an immigration visa at a consulate abroad, what will the experience be like at POE? Similar to non-immigrant admission or, if different, in what ways? Also, what can go wrong at that point? Thanks!

Asked by IMGNT 8 months ago

Everyone applying for admission at the Port of Entry is treated the same. We will be conducting an interview to determine admissibility.

For non-immigrants, you need to make sure you visited the doctor and your family member filled out the I-864 properly. Also, you need to make sure you apply for admission before your passport and/or your visa expires. If all of those check out ok, you will be fine.

If I get job out side USA when I come back do I need bring prove where am work if yes what kind prove

Asked by Hammed 7 months ago

If you are a United States Citizen, it does not matter to us where you work.

If you are a Legal Permanent Resident, lawfully, you must reside in the United States.

If you are a visitor to the United States, proof of employment outside the US would always help with you being granted admission.

You said you get supplies at the academy, does this include uniform, firearm, bullet proof vest, patches for vest, etc ?

Asked by Andrew 8 months ago

Correct for all of the above. Everything you need for work will be issued to you at the academy. Your vest you will receive a quarter to halfway through. You will be using your issued firearm throughout the academy when your at the range, however, you wont be able to keep it until after you graduate the academy. The academy keeps it in storage until your range days and up until your graduation day.

My buddy got a letter from customs stating there was a packing sent tonhim with steriods. How serious should one take this.

Asked by Joboh 8 months ago

Very serious. He should read the entire letter and see if they want him to present himself to a Customs office. He should also check to see if he was issued a penalty. If the penalty is not paid timely, it will be taken from your tax return by the IRS with interest.

I-131 is open to DACA recipients for edu, work, & humanitarian reasons. It is approved USCIS and clearly states recipient will need to be inspected and admitted to the U.S. why do officers act like they don't know what it is & threaten deportation?

Asked by Lola 8 months ago

DACA is a relatively new program that was implemented in 2012. Some officers are unfamiliar with how to process them because they are slightly different than the normal paroles.

You are not guaranteed parole into the United States under this program, or under any other parole program. US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Officers have the ultimate say at the Port of Entry when it comes to DACA or any other paroles.

Basically, USCIS cannot FORCE CBP to parole you into the United States. USCIS does not have the lawful ability to parole anyone into the United States, only CBP does. The biggest misconception is that the I-512 (Parole Document) is NOT a guaranteed parole. The easiest way to explain it is that it is a "request for parole", if you will. USCIS is REQUESTING to us that we parole you into the United States because you meet all of their guidelines. Now, it is at the discretion of the CBP officer to determine IF they want to parole you in.

Theoretically, a CBP Officer is within his lawful right to remove you from the United States IF that officers has the appropriate charges against you. However, will it happen? Most likely not. It would just cause internal conflicts between agencies. But it is possible and lawful.

Am a US citizen. No criminal record whatsoever. But the KIOSK machine gives me a cross on the receipt every time I enter the country. Any way to fix this?

Asked by cripsy 7 months ago

Most likely, your name is similar to a criminal or someone we're looking for. As a US Citizen, the best way around this is to apply for Global Entry. Under this program, your information is reviewed prior to the plane landing. This way, once you set foot in the airport, you are already cleared to proceed.

I really love this thread and the amount you have put into it! Great information and resource! I was wondering if the divorce rate/stress on a marriage is the same as you might see for police officers? Have you noticed it in your own life?

Asked by micole14 8 months ago

Thanks for the compliment!

We don't have any factual statistics like local police do, however, I would say the numbers are very similar, especially at the southern border. Officers can expect to work between two and three 16 hour shifts a week. This puts a huge damper on relationships. I would say at least 30% of the officers I worked with have been divorced at least once. 5 to 10% divorced more than once.

I got a little lucky with my wife. Before I worked for CBP, I worked 2 jobs, sometimes 3 jobs, at one time and I was rarely ever around. I would have only 1 day off and work approximately 12 to 18 hours a day every day. My wife came into this relationship already knowing that and accepting it. Once I was hired with CBP, I worked a lot less hours than I have in the past so It worked out for us.

I am looking to start my application to become a CBPO. I have smoked weed in the past. I imagine past drug use is one of the questions they ask for the polygraph test. If you answer yes, does this automatically disqualify you?

Asked by Jimmy 8 months ago

Not completely. There are a bunch of factors that could come into play. The best advice I can give you is to be completely honest on the polygraph and completely honest on the background questionnaire.

I had marijuana use in the past as well, but it wasn't habitual and I was open about it.

Is article 86 -unauthorized absence a crime of moral turpitude? Which would make me inadmissible to the us. And would that pop up on your system? I was just convicted under special court martial and spent 75 days in the brig. I'm a lpr

Asked by Jjk 7 months ago

I do not have much experience with military codes and statutes. I did do a little bit of research and I do not believe this constitutes as a Crime of Moral Turpitude (CIMT). CIMTs are usually murder, kidnapping, robbery, and aggravated assaults.

What is the scheduling like at FLETC? I may go to a local police academy as part of my bachelors degree. All I have left to do to get hired is pass background and PFT-2. Is testiing & EOD dates pretty strict? Would they wait for me to finish school?

Asked by REYWAS 6 months ago

At FLETC, most likely you will be working 0730 to 1630 with an hour lunch from 1130 to 1230. During busy seasons, I've seen some classes work 1230 to 2130.

The hiring center may try to convince you to take the job offer right away, but you can always "pass" and they will call you in the next go around for an EOD date. The PFT however, you cannot miss but you are able to schedule it when your free.

I have noticed that CBP officers at the internal checkpoints (near but not at the Mexican border) are actually fairly courteous. Is this actually a less stressful post than, say, the Canadian border, where they tend to be more gruff?

Asked by Nicholas 7 months ago

I have never worked the internal checkpoints, so I am not quite sure. The only thing I can think of is there is much less pressure for the checkpoints inside than the border. Officers at the border are hounded by management, who is hounded by their Port Director, who is hounded by the Director of Field Operations, who is hounded by congressmen/chambers of commerce/politicians regarding border wait times. The unfortunate truth is, there are a lot of politics involved with this job. Sometimes, the politics take priority of getting the job done right.

I am on bail, but it doesnt state any trave restriction. Im Permanent Resident. I want to go putside the country, but Im concern about my return.

Asked by erm989 7 months ago

I would contact the judge or probation officer for a travel letter. Make sure you have permission to leave the country prior to traveling. We do receive alerts for active warrants and we do make those arrests. Please, use due diligence and make sure everything is in order prior to leaving the country. From my experience, anyone on bail cannot leave the US.

what happens if a lpr is caught living in mexico

Asked by pepe 6 months ago

If a CBP Officer were to be the one finding out, they would process you for a Notice to Appear before an immigration judge, where he would decide if he will revoke your I-551 Lawful Permanent Resident Card.

I was told that official traveler histories specifically interrogations are confidential. Would my attorney be able to subpoena such records from a third party for a pending legal case? (i.e. perhaps via FOIA).

Asked by BruceyB. 7 months ago

I am not entirely sure when it comes to what can and cannot be subpoena'd. What I've been told is that anything related to the systems we use and the intelligence that is gathered cannot be used in court for "national security purposes". But again, I'm not completely sure.

The agency says there are a lot of career advancement opportunities once you've hit GS-12..I was wondering if you have found that to be true, and what career path most officers transfer to? Is a transfer to the FBI out of the question?

Asked by micole14 7 months ago

It is very true about the advancements after hitting GS-12. Within CBP, we have intelligence units, teams that work alongside JTTF, foreign liaison assignments, Field Trainer, and so much more.

You cannot "transfer" to FBI. You would have to apply like a normal citizen applying, you would just have a leg up with this law enforcement experience and current federal employment. I have seen several colleagues get hired for Secret Service, DEA, FBI, and HSI.

do cbp officers see your travel history when your at poe

Asked by pepe 6 months ago

Yes, every single entry and exit.

Hi, traveling in June from the UK I've applied for esta it got approved, I have 2 convictions for battery 6 years ago both the same offence, I ticked no to the serious crimes question is this right? Likely to encounter any problems?

Asked by Gavin 7 months ago

Its hard to give you a firm answer without seeing your actual record. Generally, simple battery is not considered a CIMT. Aggravated battery is a higher possibility. My suggest to you would be to apply for a visa and mention your arrest to the consular officer, who will then either approve or deny a visa. When you use ESTA, you wont know if your entry will be denied until after your plane already lands in the United States. By this point in time, if we decide to deny you entry, your vacation would have been ruined and all your money just went down the drain. If you apply for an actual visa at the embassy, you will receive a definitive answer prior to making your travel arrangements.

What's up with the recent news stories about CBP officers asking Muslims about their religion and their thoughts about Donald Trump? Would this be considered religious profiling? Is this allowed, and if so, what is the purpose of these questions?

Asked by sstevens 7 months ago

One thing I will say from personal experience, I had to hold someone for about 45 minutes before I was able to clear him in our system. His name was similar to a convicted felon wanted for child endangerment. My job was to determine if this person in front of me was the same person who was wanted. I cordially explained to him why he was back there and what I was trying to accomplish. He was very friendly and thanked me for doing what I was doing. About 4 days later, I read a news article that and this person was on it. He told the news outlet that he was locked in a room for 2 hours, denied food and water, and was treated like a criminal. I couldn't believe it! I treat everyone with professionally and with respect, this person even acknowledged it, and yet here he is in the paper saying all of this.

Needless to say, the news, or the person being interviewed, may not always portray the accurate truth.

To answer your question as best I can, we are not legally allowed to make a determination based on religion. It is against the law for anyone (CBP, local police, even an employer) to make a decision based on religion.

Hello Officer,
Thank you for your answers. Im an LPR with a reckless driving conviction (2015). I am a bit nervous to travel. Is CBP currently operating under more aggressive guidelines to put LPRs in removal proceedings for offenses at the POE?

Asked by LPR Placed in Removal Proceedings 6 months ago

Nothing has really changed since President Trump took office, despite what the media portrays. From my recent experiences, we haven't really been "more aggressive" than we have in the past. That being said, reckless driving is not a CIMT and you will not be placed under removal proceedings for that conviction alone.

Still Mae. Entry 03/10/2016-03/31/2016 next is 05/22/2016-08/10/16 then 09/07/2016 to 02/27/2017 then planning to return on the last of April or early May 2017. Is this okay to re enter the US this fast?

Asked by Mae 7 months ago

You need to ask yourself the following question, "If an American citizen came to my country for X many months and comes back X weeks later to stay X many months again, is he really just visiting?"

This what every officer thinks about when seeing someone with a history of remaining in the US for extended periods of time. Every officer calculates "Is this alien spending more time inside this country than outside?"

Theres no clear answer to your question, you just need to make sure your not spending more time inside the US than outside.

Have you ever worked in the mail room, checking to make sure there are no drugs or contraband coming into the country? I think that would be so interesting. Personally, I think that is what I want to do.

Asked by Erik 6 months ago

Sorry, this is an area that I am not familiar in. I've never done it, but from people that I've spoken to, they really enjoy it. The problem is, you cant get hired directly to that position. You would have to start as a regular officer then find an opening for that position. Chances are very slim, so I would recommend that if you apply for this job, don't apply with the sole intention of working at a mail room.

How is FLETC CBP Officer basic training structured on the calendar? Do they graduate three classes a year (seasonal). Is it just a May to July thing? Do all Field Ops personnel go to Glynco? Thanks for the help.

Asked by REYWAS 6 months ago

When I went through FLETC, we had 1 to 2 classes graduating every week. Now its slowed down a bit, so its about 1 a month. FLETC is 4.5 months long, not including 6 weeks of Spanish training. In CBP, all armed positions and Agriculture Specialists go to FLETC, the others do not.

I took the polygraph about 8 months ago but did not pass. Do I still have a chance of getting within the department if I reapply in the future?

Asked by Dave 5 months ago

I believe there is a two year waiting period to take the polygraph again. The unfortunate thing is, the polygraph eliminates too many good people. I would recommend trying again after the two years!

I'm planning on flying to Georgia but I'm nervous as I have heard rumours about visitors getting accused of over staying (I'm going under the VWP)

My question is will documents like a payslip be enough to demonstrate otherwise??

Asked by A random traveler 5 months ago

It is always wise to bring as much evidence as possible to show ties to your home country. The burden of proof is on the alien seeking admission.

Pay slips, mortgage payments, bank statements, etc.

Hi If I am given a firm offer of employment how long will I have to move to my post?(pre and post academy) Do you recommend getting an apartment while at the pre-academy duty location so I have a place to return upon completing the academy? Thanks

Asked by ValCBPOCandidate 5 months ago

If you receive a firm offer of employment, generally its only a month or so before you report for Pre-Academy. I would recommend renting a room or an apartment for the 30 days of pre-academy. It would not make financial sense to keep the place while your at FLETC. During your last month at FLETC is when you want to start searching for apartments or possibly return to something that is month-to-month until you are more situated.

For GS-5 in San Ysidro, CA, the starting CBP officer salary is around $36,000. How are we expected to survive all that?

Asked by X. Lewis 4 months ago

That's what I started at and it is tough. I ended up making some good friends during pre-academy and academy, the three of us shared a townhouse together so it worked out well. $36,000 is just base salary, your really looking at about $55,000 for your first year with overtime, holidays, and night pay.

I'm interested in becoming a CBPO, but one of the things I'm consistently worried about is being forced to work 16 hour days, as I've seen some people complain about. Is this a common situation(specifically for Northern protection)?

Asked by Whit 4 months ago

Yes, the unfortunate part of life is working 16 hour days for this job. Depending on your location, this could happen twice a week, once a month, or never, etc. If you are serious about this job, you have to accept the fact that you may be forced to work overtime. In my honest opinion, I dont think there is any officer in this agency who has not been forced overtime.

I am somewhat pudgy with no LEO or military experience going to FLETC this Summer. I scraped by the PFT. What is the work out program like and its expectations at FLETC? Do they invest in conditioning people or do they expect you to have it together?

Asked by Reywas 5 months ago

I suppose they expect you to have it somewhat together. At the very least, they want to see you motivated. Anyone can pass the PFT's at the academy if they try hard enough and set goals for themselves. I also barely scraped by the first PFT. But after enough conditioning throughout the academy, my 1.5 mile went from 15 mins and change to 11 minutes and 52 seconds.

You will be required to do physical training two days a week, 2 hours each day. Its up to the instructor on what they want to train (conditioning or defensive tactics). Otherwise, on your time your free to train as much or as little as you'd like.

What are the houses like in the southern region I have a family and if I get hired and have to move them down there I want to know what the living conditions will be by the port of entre

Asked by Michael 5 months ago

It all depends on which areas we're talking about. San Ysidro Port of Entry is very different compared to Yuma, AZ. Your best bet would be to research the surrounding areas on Zillow or Trulia to gather fairly accurate information.

Can cbp officer hand cuff you to inspected your vehicle

Asked by Esmeralda Navarro 4 months ago

Yes. People forget that we are law enforcement officers. We handcuff people for a number of reasons, it does not necessarily mean your under arrest. If I think it'll be safer for everyone if i handcuff you before I search your car, I am completely justified in doing so. We must always take officer safety into account. If your twice my size and intoxicated, I am going to handcuff you so the situation does not turn ugly.



I am a legal permanent resident. What are some probable outcomes if I refuse to unlock my phone/laptop at the border? What's the worst-case outcome?

Thanks! This is a great thread.

Asked by James 5 months ago

You are not required to give your password to your laptop or phone to the officer. However, the officer only needs reasonable suspicion that you may have illicit information in the computer to use a device which unlocks it. In order to use the device, your computer would be seized and brought to a facility. This process takes time.

Worst case outcome for an LPR - You will be held at the border for several hours (later released) and your computer could be seized for several months. Unless you have something illegal, then it changes thins depending on what you have.

Thank you for taking the time to answer our questions.

I find that my interests lie in data, trends, and solving puzzles. Would you say being a CBP officer affords these kinds of opportunities?

Asked by ajm 5 months ago

There are many opportunities within CBP. If your motivated, after a few years in the agency, you can apply for certain teams within your Port or specific national teams that do targeting. Their role is looking at data and trends for smuggling contraband into the United States. From first hand experience, some of those guys are unbelievably skilled at their jobs!

The only problem is, you need to tough it out through the rookie years, which could range from 4 to 8 years.

What happened when a illegal immigrant gets caught crossing the border after they were banned for 20 years from the usa

Asked by Kassandra about 1 month ago

 

What happened when a illegal immigrant gets caught crossing the border after they were banned for 20 years from the usa

Asked by Kassandra about 1 month ago

 

When I first applied I picked as key west Florida because southwest border (where I live ) wasn't available. Can I change it? And if I cant..silly question but I pay for all the relocation fees?

Asked by Monica A about 1 month ago

 

Hi, I want to apply for cbp the only thing is I have no degree or experience in criminal justice any advice?
I only have my high school diploma

Asked by Deebee about 1 month ago

 

10 years military and 2 years as a deputy now. Applying to WA, MT & ID boarders. My current job is fast paced and exciting but leaves little room for family life. What is your off time like and are you disconnected from work?

Asked by Cop about 1 month ago

 

Officer I was granted advance parole to follow a treatment but my parole was issued by USCIS for November 1st 2017.
I would like to travel in October attend my medical treatment and come back after november 1st.

Would that mean a problem for me?

Asked by Rdmn 28 days ago

 

Hi, thanks for all your answers. I am just curious, how detailed the info about a person is showing on the screen when you guys slide the passport. Like where he lives, who is he married to, which employer does he work for etc?

Asked by Curious George 3 months ago

 

Sir- im from a vwp country with low usa immigration rates.I am worried to death cos I overstayed an extra day on my trip last year. Is there any chance that my future o-1 visa application may be denied based on this? Thank you so much

Asked by Peter 3 months ago

 

..hi Pete again, I otherwise have clean background and my previous usa visits were legal: j-1 for 2 mths in 2008 and brief transit in 2014.Should I expect to be questioned abt this or even denied entry at poe next time (supposing I have valid visa)

Asked by Peter 3 months ago

 

Hello, recently I got out of the military "navy" and I have a interview coming up for CBP officer. However, I am thinking about joining back the military and stuck between the two. I'm not sure what life is like in CBP or which is better. Thoughts?

Asked by Caleb Holland 3 months ago

 

I was granted a US B1/B2 Visa from a Consulate in GB. I could not use the ESTA as I have a criminal record from my youth. As I have been granted a Visa what is the likely hood of the CBP Officer denying me entry and revoking my Visa?

Asked by Brian Cooper 3 months ago

 

When I visited US, i was asked how long I am staying I said 10 days,when entered travelagnt suggested a tour for some states so I extended one more mth(i was allowed for 6 mths) will this cause problem next visit, r these answers recorded ?

Asked by Dany 3 months ago

 

I am a Canadian citizen. I have been granted a K-1 visa. But before I use it to enter the US, I would like to enter one more time as a visitor (and 'save' the K-1 visa for a later date). Is it possible?

Asked by Emanuel Freitas 3 months ago

 

I have a valid tourist visa in my old passport. First name is slightly different between visa and new passport.In visa it's GA AFAR (a space) and in new pp it's Gaafar.All the other info/names are identical,even the photo.Will this cause problems?

Asked by alnassarg@spu.edu 3 months ago

 

I have a valid tourist visa in my old passport. First name is slightly different between visa and new passport.In visa it's GA AFAR (a space) and in new pp it's Gaafar.All the other info/names are identical,even the photo.Will this cause problems?

Asked by Gaafar 3 months ago

 

I have a B1 visa for 6-month volunteering pg in the US starting on August 1. I want to come in the US before the pg begins but visa B1 is 6 months max. Can I stay 2 weeks (until 19th) on an ESTA, depart the US, and fly back to activate my visa then?

Asked by French_citizen 2 months ago

 

Thank you for answering my questions in advance.
Will age be a factor once I am hired on with cbpo and wants to test for DEA later?
What kind of guns are issued?
Do I have to do 20 years to get FERS? That means I can't retire till I am 60 YOA?

Asked by Jas 2 months ago

 

What if a non citizen entered on esta, then left without a passport (passport on which the person has entered was lost). How will the exit be recorder?? The person left on a return certificate from an embassy that allowed him to exit without id

Asked by Allana 2 months ago

 

Hello, I have a quick question regarding GS level qualifications. As a current active duty Sergeant, (no degree or law enforcement exp) would I be able to qualify for GS9 or the GS7?

Asked by Drew Hunt 2 months ago

 

Afternoon, do you know of any CBP Officers in the northeastern US awncering questions for locale specifics ?

What's the ACTUAL probability of being promoted every year(ish ) up through the non compete promotions ?

Asked by Ben 2 months ago

 

Good day,
Is it worth corresponding with a recruiter or are they like any recruiter the world over ?

What would the procedure be if a person was interested in becoming an animal handler?

Asked by Ben 2 months ago

 

Lastly , if you reside near (60ish miles between) two POEs and both are understaffed, should a person anticipate spending time at both locations ? Thank you very much for your time. We all appreciate it !

Asked by Ben 2 months ago

 

I have a F1 visa for UC Berkley, but I will be visiting my friend in San Diego and traveling with her to Berkley via road. Will this be a problem at the POE ?

Asked by shubham 2 months ago

 

Hi, I wanted to know if meeting someone online in person will be a red flag to a CBP officer and if i will be declined entry because of that, as I have heard many stories of people being denied entry. I also want to sight see and meet the online interest that I have been talking to for two years. Is that considered a valid reason for visiting the states, as I am only staying for two weeks and definitely have no intentions of staying beyond that and also have proof of that as I have university to attend to back home but would never do such a thing regardless. Thank you if you could help that would be much appreciated.

Asked by Kay 2 months ago

 

I took the polygraph yesterday. Halfway through, I had to stop the exam to update the background info because I remembered that I had smoked weed 3x instead of 2x. Now I am waiting for the background check to come back. Is there still hope for me?

Asked by lalis94 2 months ago

 

Hello am a US permanent resident Am planning on coming to the US with a boarding foil after spending 10 months will I have issues with CBP officers? second question is how long does it take before I get my boarding foil? Thanks

Asked by John about 1 month ago

 

How did you become interested in this career?

What are the aspects of this career that you like?

What are the aspects of this career that you dislike?

Which classes or training did you take in college?

Asked by nrekay 6 months ago

 

Is there opportunity for advancement in this career field?

Can you describe your daily work?
Which skill do you think is the most important to perform for this job?

What do you do to keep your skills current?

Asked by nrekay 6 months ago